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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Final preparations are underway for the Global Maternal Health Conference in Delhi! With only a couple of weeks until the conference, things have been very busy at the Maternal Health Task Force! Take a look below for the recently finalized live stream schedule. We will be streaming (open-access, no registration necessary) all plenary sessions as well as a number of parallel and panel sessions. In addition, ALL sessions will be archived for future viewing.

If you are interested in guest blogging about the conference sessions, click here for more info.

Cross-posted from the MHTF Blog.

In just a couple of weeks, the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) will convene an unprecedented gathering of over 600 maternal health experts and their allies in a global technical and programmatic meeting. The Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 aims to build on the existing momentum around MDG5.  The conference will focus on lessons learned, neglected issues, and innovative approaches to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. The anticipated outcome is increased consensus around the evidence, programs and advocacy needed to reduce preventable maternal mortality and morbidity.

In an effort to engage and inform a broader audience, the plenaries and several sessions will be live streamed.

For information on each of the sessions that will be live streamed–including speakers and abstracts, click on the session title below.

This schedule is in India Standard Time. Click here for a time zone converter!

ACCESS LIVE STREAM FOR ALL SESSIONS HERE.

August 30th, 2010

9:00-10:00 Inaugural

11:00-12:30 Plenary Session:
Global Progress on Maternal Health: The Numbers and Their Implications

13:30- 15:00 Parallel Session:
Human Resources for Maternal and Newborn Health: The Key Element

15:30- 17:00 Parallel Session:
Extremely Affordable Technologies for Maternal and Newborn Survival

August 31st, 2010

9:00-10:30 Plenary:
Community and Facility Interventions: Reframing the Discussion

10:45-12:15 Parallel Session:
Task-Shifting to Expand Access to EmOC: Developing a Deeper Understanding of What it Takes

13:45-15:15 Parallel Session:
Prevention and Treatment of Postpartum Hemorrhage

15:30-17:15 Panel Session:
The Next Generation of Maternal Health Solutions from the Young Champions of Maternal Health

September 1st, 2010

9:00-10:00 Plenary Session:

Maternal Health Accountability: Successes, Failures and New Approaches

10:45-12:15 Parallel Session:
Indian Models of Public-Private Partnerships

13:45-15:15 Parallel Session:
Informatics to Improve Systems

15:30-17:15 Panel Session:
Maternal Health Digital

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Tuesday (6/8) marked day two of Women Deliver 2010. Day two was all about innovation and (high and low) technology to improve the health of women and infants worldwide–in fact, the conference organizers marketed Tuesday’s sessions as a stand-alone symposium called Technology as a Catalyst for Social Transformation.

Take a look at two examples of technologies that were discussed at the conference on Tuesday…

Microbicide Vaginal Rings (High Tech)

“The nonprofit International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM) today announced the initiation of the first trial among women in Africa testing a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral drug (ARV) that could one day be used to prevent HIV transmission during sex. The clinical trial, known as IPM 015, tests the safety and acceptability of an innovative approach that adapts a successful technology from the reproductive health field to give women around the world a tool to protect themselves from HIV infection…”

Read the full press release here.

Clean Delivery Kits (Low Tech)

Clean Birth Kits–Potential to Deliver?, a publication supported by Save the Children/Saving Newborn Lives, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Immpact (University of Aberdeen), and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth, was released at a session at Women Deliver yesterday. The session was chaired by Claudia Morrissey of Save the Children; moderated by Richard Horton, Editor of the Lancet; and presenters included Wendy Graham of University of Aberdeen, and Haris Ahmed of PAIMAN. The goal of the session was to summarise the evidence base for clean delivery kits, discuss practical implementation experiences from the field, and to have a lively debate on the “risks” associated with promoting birth kits. The report will be available online soon.

Subscribe to the MHTF Blog for updates on this project/report–as well as updates on other MHTF projects and commentary on a variety of maternal health issues.

Check out a recent blog post, A Good Idea or an Expensive Diversion: Workshop on the Evidence Base for Clean Birth Kits, by Ann Blanc, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force, on a workshop leading up to the new report on delivery kits.

Click here for the webcast of a session at Women Deliver 2010 that explores “What’s on the Horizon” for new technologies in contraception.

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Kaiser Health News reports on a variety of innovative approaches to global health challenges that were developed in developing countries like Haiti and Nigeria–and are now being utilized in developed countries. Dr. Michael Merson, director of the Duke Global Health Institute, explains that in the past, development work was seen as a one way street, with the rich helping the poor.  He points out that these days have passed and we are entering a new era of international development that involves a “true sense of shared partnership.” This article highlights several global health innovations developed in resource poor settings that are now being adopted in the US, like Kangaroo Care.

Kaiser Health News

“…GE is tapping into the increasingly popular idea that medical innovation should be a global two-way street in which the West benefits from the resourcefulness and frugality poorer nations apply to health problems. The idea isn’t new, but it’s gaining traction, beyond the creation of products and technology, as public health experts rethink ways to prevent disease and deliver care…

…’Kangaroo care,’ an approach developed in Colombia, is another example. With a major shortage of incubators, doctors advised mothers to cradle preterm babies in a sling. They did so well that it changed what had been the conventional approach in the U.S….”

Read the full story here.

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Tom Watson, author of  CauseWired: Plugging In, Getting Involved, Changing the World, writes about ten technologies, both high and low tech, that are empowering women across the developing world—and several have the potential to directly improve maternal health.

The Daily Beast

Among the technologies Watson writes about are safe birthing kits with soap, a plastic sheet, a razor blade and string (pretty low-tech!); E-Learning to train and certify 20,000 nurses in Kenya by 2011; and text messaging/social networking platforms for communities to discuss and push for change on issues like female genital cutting and early marriage.

Read the full story, Technologies that Empower Women.

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