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Posts Tagged ‘postpartum’

Health officials in the state of Bihar, India have decided to develop a computer software/database that will track expecting mothers, new mothers, and newborns at the village level. The goal of the project is to keep a close eye on maternal and infant mortality in each and every village in Bihar–as well as share important health information via SMS.

iGovernment

“In a bid to minimise maternal and infant mortality in the state, the Bihar government has decided to create a database of each pregnant woman and newborn babies at village level to track their health conditions and provide prenatal and postpartum care to mothers.

The data base would offer unique named-based searches on mother and children.

The data will include date of vaccination and expected date of delivery of pregnant woman. If the family of the expecting mother has any cell phone, they would be informed through SMS. In all 80,797 anganwadi sevikas across the state have been involved to make the campaign a success.

The decision to create software to track the health conditions of expecting women and infants was taken at a meeting of senior officials of the Health Department…”

Read the full story. For more on this story from FIGO, click here.

More on maternal health in Bihar:

  1. Click here to read about a recent agreement between the state government of Bihar and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in an effort to boost the public health of the state.
  2. Click here to read about PRACHAR, a Pathfinder International project that aims to disseminate family planning and reproductive health behavior change communications messages throughout 700 villages in Bihar.
  3. Click here for a recent post on conditional cash transfers to increase in-facility births in many states, including Bihar.

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The application process is now closed for this position. (7/22/10)

The Safe Motherhood Program at UCSF is accepting applications for an upcoming internship opportunity in the Copper-belt of Zambia. The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will support the start-up of a randomized control trial of the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) in 24 midwifery-led clinics as a low-tech and low-cost life-saving method for treating shock, resuscitating, stabilizing and preventing further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage.

See below for background information on the Safe Motherhood Program and the use of the NASG–as well as details on the internship including expected deliverables, qualifications, timeline, and information on how to apply.

Background

The mission of Safe Motherhood Program at the University of California, San Francisco, is to prevent maternal deaths by promoting women’s health and human rights.   This international research program is part of the UCSF Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, which engages in the advancement of new reproductive health technologies and development of innovative programs to improve reproductive health.  The Safe Motherhood Program is also a member of the Women’s Health and Empowerment Center of Expertise (COE), one of three centers within the University of California Global Health Institute.  The primary goals of the Safe Motherhood Program are to:

  1. Conduct rigorous, relevant and timely research resulting in new and applicable knowledge
  2. Reduce pregnancy related death and disability
  3. Ensure maternal survival through principles of respect, dignity and equality
  4. Create direct and practical links from research to policy to implementation
  5. Train health care workers in low-resource settings
  6. Raise community awareness of maternal health
  7. Disseminate information and innovations globally

Working with distinguished colleagues in a variety of countries, the Safe Motherhood Program has the knowledge, skills, vision, technology, and energy to make a real difference in the advancement of women’s reproductive health throughout the world.

Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG)

In many poor countries women deliver at home, often without skilled attendants or at clinics with limited services available.  If complications arise and a woman bleeds heavily, one, two or all of the “three delays” (Thaddeus and Maine, 1994) may impede her ability to access timely treatment.  Many women do not survive these delays.  In recognition of the direct and indirect root causes of maternal death and disability, the Safe Motherhood Program works to ensure all women have an equitable opportunity to survive childbirth.

A major research effort of the Safe Motherhood Program, the NASG is a low-technology and low cost life-saving device used to treat shock, resuscitate, stabilize and prevent further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage (www.lifewraps.org).  Use of the NASG as part of standard management of shock and hemorrhage has demonstrated promising outcomes for women in low-resource settings, where appropriate health care providers and technologies are limited or non-existent.  To date, NASG use has reduced maternal mortality and morbidity by over 50%.

Internship Opportunity

To build upon the early and promising data, a randomized cluster trial is underway in Zambia and Zimbabwe.  Specifically, the trial addresses the question of whether the early application of the NASG at midwife-led maternity clinics, before transport to a Referral Hospital, will decrease maternal mortality and morbidity.

The internship will take place in the Copper-belt of Zambia and support the start-up of the randomized control trial of the NASG in 24 midwifery-led maternity clinics.  The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will work with the clinics during their transition from Phase 2 study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility) to Phase 3 of the research study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility in the NASG).  Specific activities will include: Observing clinical procedures at the clinics and supporting clinical protocol adherence, observing data collection and supporting research protocol adherence, helping/training data collectors become familiar with data collection forms, matching data collection forms begun at the clinic with data collection forms completed at the referral facilities, supervising cleaning and completion of data collection forms, and training new providers (midwives, residents, medical officers) in the addition of the NASG to emergency response for hemorrhage.

The intern(s) will receive mentorship and supervision from the Safe Motherhood team members both in Zambia and in the US during the field experience.

Deliverables

Weekly reports on progress, participation in weekly calls/Skype with Project Coordinator are expected.

Qualifications

  • Professional degree, graduate student or junior faculty in the health or social sciences (such as medicine, nursing, public health, anthropology, sociology, etc.)
  • Previous experience in health or social science research
  • Knowledge of global sexual and reproductive health, maternal health preferred
  • Ability to work well with partners
  • Flexibility and willingness to travel
  • Highest preference for those with some midwifery/obstetric experience or those who have worked on field-based research projects

Timeline

The internship requires a minimum eight-week commitment (Fall 2010 – Winter 2011) to live and work in Zambia.  Preference will be given to applicants who can remain in Zambia longer than 8-weeks.

Expression of Interest

To apply for the internship, please send a current resume and cover letter to Ms. Elizabeth Butrick (ebutrick@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) with copy to Ms. Jennifer Clark (JClark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) by August 15, 2010.

For more information on the use of the NASG (specifically the LifeWrap), check out a recent guest post from the Director of the Safe Motherhood Project, Suellen Miller, on the Maternal Health Task Force‘s new MedScape blog, GlobalMama. (You will need to register with MedScape. Registration is free.)

Also, take a look at www.lifewrap.org for additional information about LifeWraps.

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Today, May 5th, is International Day of the Midwife—and UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives have released a joint statement calling on world leaders to address the shortage of 350,000 midwives around the world. Their statement explains that increased investments in training midwives are critical to reaching the most marginalized communities–who typically lack access to health services.

UNFPA

“…The UNFPA and ICM point out that midwives can prevent up to 90 per cent of maternal deaths where they are authorized to practice their competencies and play a full role during pregnancy, childbirth and after birth. They have a critical role in providing family planning, counselling, and preventing HIV transmission from mother to child.

As the world gears up for the 10-year review of the Millennium Development Goals, both organizations will be campaigning to increase funding for goals 4, 5 and 6 to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health and combat HIV and AIDS.

We look forward to the high-level Midwifery Symposium from 5 to 6 June in Washington, D.C., immediately preceding the Women Deliver Conference. The symposium aims to raise awareness around the core role of midwifery services in achieving MDGs 4, 5 and 6; address challenges in global standards on education and regulation of midwives; and strengthen midwifery services…”

Read the full statement.

Also, take a look at this video statement of the President of the International Confederation of Midwives, Bridget Lynch.

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According to a report by Observatorio de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva, Argentina has the means to address  maternal mortality, but fails to do so because of a lack of political will.

Inter Press Service News Agency (IPS)

“…Argentina has a maternal mortality rate of 44 for every 100,000 live births – two and a half times higher than the average in neighbouring Chile and Uruguay, and a far cry from the six per 100,000 or seven per 100,000 live births in Spain and Italy, for example. Both national authorities and independent experts working on these issues say that at this pace, Argentina will fail to meet the United Nations Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of significantly reducing the number of maternal deaths by 2015, bringing it down to Chile’s and Uruguay’s current levels…”

Read the full story here.

Visit the Observatorio de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva site here.

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