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Posts Tagged ‘postpartum hemorrhage’

The Safe Motherhood Program is currently hiring for the Lusaka
Coordinator position. The successful candidate will be based in Lusaka, Zambia and will work on a Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial (CRCT) for the Non-pneumatic Anti Shock Garment (NASG).  Candidates can apply directly online through the UCSF Careers page. Deadline to apply is May 31st, 2011!

See below for more info on the position.

Job Title: Lusaka Coordinator

Job Code and Payroll Title:  7234 ANALYST I

Req Number: 35590BR

Position Start Date: July 15, 2011

Job Summary: The Lusaka Coordinator is responsible for data management,
reporting, site administration and project support on a Cluster
Randomized Clinical Trial (CRCT) for the Non-pneumatic Anti Shock
Garment (NASG). The study, supported by NIH/NICHD and the Bill and
Melinda Gates Foundation
, is to demonstrate if the NASG saves the lives
of women hemorrhaging in childbirth. The candidate will be required to
live full time in Lusaka, Zambia. Duties include providing research,
administrative and logistical support to the study. Duties would include
all forms of clinical trial coordination for this hospital and clinic
based study, including data form review for completeness and accuracy,
case tracking, logistics and supplies, training coordinators and data
collector/clinicians on clinical and study protocol adherence,
completion of protocol violation and adverse event documentation,
administrative oversight and mentoring and supervising student interns
(medical, nursing, midwifery, and public health students).

The Lusaka Study Coordinator will serve as part of the Safe Motherhood
Team of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Department of
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF
; will serve as
the local liaison between the NASG studies in Lusaka, Zambia and the
investigators and project staff at UCSF; will serve as the
administrative and research team leader for Lusaka, collaborate with the
UCSF Copperbelt, Zambia Coordinator as a peer, and will report directly
to Elizabeth Butrick, the NASG Study Director in San Francisco. Willing
to commit for at least 6 months, with a possible extension depending on
the availability of funds.

Required Qualifications: BA/BS with a major in a related field and one
year of experience in administrative analysis or operations research; or
an equivalent combination of education and experience; at least three
months of experience in a developing country; excellent attention to
detail, good organizational skills; competent in EXCEL; proficient in
Word, Internet; problem Solving Skills.

Preferred Qualifications: MPH or master’s in related field; experience
with research; ability to train, mentor and guide others; experience
with data management systems; knowledge of maternal health issues;
experience in Africa.

Note: Fingerprinting and background check required.

Note: Position to end six months from the date of hire, with the
possibility to be extended.

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Final preparations are underway for the Global Maternal Health Conference in Delhi! With only a couple of weeks until the conference, things have been very busy at the Maternal Health Task Force! Take a look below for the recently finalized live stream schedule. We will be streaming (open-access, no registration necessary) all plenary sessions as well as a number of parallel and panel sessions. In addition, ALL sessions will be archived for future viewing.

If you are interested in guest blogging about the conference sessions, click here for more info.

Cross-posted from the MHTF Blog.

In just a couple of weeks, the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) will convene an unprecedented gathering of over 600 maternal health experts and their allies in a global technical and programmatic meeting. The Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 aims to build on the existing momentum around MDG5.  The conference will focus on lessons learned, neglected issues, and innovative approaches to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity. The anticipated outcome is increased consensus around the evidence, programs and advocacy needed to reduce preventable maternal mortality and morbidity.

In an effort to engage and inform a broader audience, the plenaries and several sessions will be live streamed.

For information on each of the sessions that will be live streamed–including speakers and abstracts, click on the session title below.

This schedule is in India Standard Time. Click here for a time zone converter!

ACCESS LIVE STREAM FOR ALL SESSIONS HERE.

August 30th, 2010

9:00-10:00 Inaugural

11:00-12:30 Plenary Session:
Global Progress on Maternal Health: The Numbers and Their Implications

13:30- 15:00 Parallel Session:
Human Resources for Maternal and Newborn Health: The Key Element

15:30- 17:00 Parallel Session:
Extremely Affordable Technologies for Maternal and Newborn Survival

August 31st, 2010

9:00-10:30 Plenary:
Community and Facility Interventions: Reframing the Discussion

10:45-12:15 Parallel Session:
Task-Shifting to Expand Access to EmOC: Developing a Deeper Understanding of What it Takes

13:45-15:15 Parallel Session:
Prevention and Treatment of Postpartum Hemorrhage

15:30-17:15 Panel Session:
The Next Generation of Maternal Health Solutions from the Young Champions of Maternal Health

September 1st, 2010

9:00-10:00 Plenary Session:

Maternal Health Accountability: Successes, Failures and New Approaches

10:45-12:15 Parallel Session:
Indian Models of Public-Private Partnerships

13:45-15:15 Parallel Session:
Informatics to Improve Systems

15:30-17:15 Panel Session:
Maternal Health Digital

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On Sunday, the New York Times ran an Op-Ed by Nicholas Kristof about the use of Misoprostol for medical abortion. In his column, Another Pill That Could Cause a Revolution, Nick explains that Misoprostol is a safe and cheap method for ending a pregnancy. It is also difficult to regulate because the drug was originally intended to prevent stomach ulcers–and is also used to treat postpartum hemorrhage.

Excerpt from the column:

“Could the decades-long global impasse over abortion worldwide be overcome — by little white pills costing less than $1 each?

That seems possible, for these pills are beginning to revolutionize abortion around the world, especially in poor countries. One result may be tens of thousands of women’s lives saved each year.

Five-sixths of abortions take place in developing countries, where poor sterilization and training often make the procedure dangerous. Up to 70,000 women die a year from complications of abortions, according to the World Health Organization.

But researchers are finding an alternative that is safe, cheap and very difficult for governments to restrict — misoprostol, a medication originally intended to prevent stomach ulcers…”

Read the full story here.

Click here to learn about a recent initiative organized by Gynuity Health Projects to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and acceptability of sublingual misoprostol to treat postpartum hemorrhage.

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The application process is now closed for this position. (7/22/10)

The Safe Motherhood Program at UCSF is accepting applications for an upcoming internship opportunity in the Copper-belt of Zambia. The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will support the start-up of a randomized control trial of the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) in 24 midwifery-led clinics as a low-tech and low-cost life-saving method for treating shock, resuscitating, stabilizing and preventing further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage.

See below for background information on the Safe Motherhood Program and the use of the NASG–as well as details on the internship including expected deliverables, qualifications, timeline, and information on how to apply.

Background

The mission of Safe Motherhood Program at the University of California, San Francisco, is to prevent maternal deaths by promoting women’s health and human rights.   This international research program is part of the UCSF Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, which engages in the advancement of new reproductive health technologies and development of innovative programs to improve reproductive health.  The Safe Motherhood Program is also a member of the Women’s Health and Empowerment Center of Expertise (COE), one of three centers within the University of California Global Health Institute.  The primary goals of the Safe Motherhood Program are to:

  1. Conduct rigorous, relevant and timely research resulting in new and applicable knowledge
  2. Reduce pregnancy related death and disability
  3. Ensure maternal survival through principles of respect, dignity and equality
  4. Create direct and practical links from research to policy to implementation
  5. Train health care workers in low-resource settings
  6. Raise community awareness of maternal health
  7. Disseminate information and innovations globally

Working with distinguished colleagues in a variety of countries, the Safe Motherhood Program has the knowledge, skills, vision, technology, and energy to make a real difference in the advancement of women’s reproductive health throughout the world.

Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG)

In many poor countries women deliver at home, often without skilled attendants or at clinics with limited services available.  If complications arise and a woman bleeds heavily, one, two or all of the “three delays” (Thaddeus and Maine, 1994) may impede her ability to access timely treatment.  Many women do not survive these delays.  In recognition of the direct and indirect root causes of maternal death and disability, the Safe Motherhood Program works to ensure all women have an equitable opportunity to survive childbirth.

A major research effort of the Safe Motherhood Program, the NASG is a low-technology and low cost life-saving device used to treat shock, resuscitate, stabilize and prevent further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage (www.lifewraps.org).  Use of the NASG as part of standard management of shock and hemorrhage has demonstrated promising outcomes for women in low-resource settings, where appropriate health care providers and technologies are limited or non-existent.  To date, NASG use has reduced maternal mortality and morbidity by over 50%.

Internship Opportunity

To build upon the early and promising data, a randomized cluster trial is underway in Zambia and Zimbabwe.  Specifically, the trial addresses the question of whether the early application of the NASG at midwife-led maternity clinics, before transport to a Referral Hospital, will decrease maternal mortality and morbidity.

The internship will take place in the Copper-belt of Zambia and support the start-up of the randomized control trial of the NASG in 24 midwifery-led maternity clinics.  The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will work with the clinics during their transition from Phase 2 study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility) to Phase 3 of the research study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility in the NASG).  Specific activities will include: Observing clinical procedures at the clinics and supporting clinical protocol adherence, observing data collection and supporting research protocol adherence, helping/training data collectors become familiar with data collection forms, matching data collection forms begun at the clinic with data collection forms completed at the referral facilities, supervising cleaning and completion of data collection forms, and training new providers (midwives, residents, medical officers) in the addition of the NASG to emergency response for hemorrhage.

The intern(s) will receive mentorship and supervision from the Safe Motherhood team members both in Zambia and in the US during the field experience.

Deliverables

Weekly reports on progress, participation in weekly calls/Skype with Project Coordinator are expected.

Qualifications

  • Professional degree, graduate student or junior faculty in the health or social sciences (such as medicine, nursing, public health, anthropology, sociology, etc.)
  • Previous experience in health or social science research
  • Knowledge of global sexual and reproductive health, maternal health preferred
  • Ability to work well with partners
  • Flexibility and willingness to travel
  • Highest preference for those with some midwifery/obstetric experience or those who have worked on field-based research projects

Timeline

The internship requires a minimum eight-week commitment (Fall 2010 – Winter 2011) to live and work in Zambia.  Preference will be given to applicants who can remain in Zambia longer than 8-weeks.

Expression of Interest

To apply for the internship, please send a current resume and cover letter to Ms. Elizabeth Butrick (ebutrick@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) with copy to Ms. Jennifer Clark (JClark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) by August 15, 2010.

For more information on the use of the NASG (specifically the LifeWrap), check out a recent guest post from the Director of the Safe Motherhood Project, Suellen Miller, on the Maternal Health Task Force‘s new MedScape blog, GlobalMama. (You will need to register with MedScape. Registration is free.)

Also, take a look at www.lifewrap.org for additional information about LifeWraps.

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