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Posts Tagged ‘Maternova’

On November 15th, Maternova, an organization that conducts continuous research into the latest innovations impacting maternal and newborn health, featured the “paperless partogram” on their blog. The blog post explains that for the past thirty years, the partogram has been the recommended practice for preventing prolonged labor in low-resource settings–but it seems that not all health workers find it to be an appropriate tool for the contexts in which they work.

Maternova

“…The partograph is a low-cost tool for saving the lives of mothers and babies. But does that mean it is an appropriate tool? Dr. A. K. Debdas of India would say no. Even after the WHO simplified the partograph model to make it more user-friendly in 2000, the partograph is still rarely used in low-resource areas, and, when actually used, it is rarely interpreted correctly (2). Debdas argues that the WHO’s partograph fails to meet the organization’s own requirements for appropriate technology: the partograph has not been adapted to local needs, is not acceptable to those who use it, and cannot be used given the available resources. Debdas believes the partograph is simply too time-consuming for overburdened clinicians and too complicated for many skilled birth attendants—many of whom have not received higher education.

Dr. Debdas proposes a new, low-skill method for preventing prolonged labor—the paperless partogram. It takes 20 seconds, requires only basic addition and the reading of a clock or watch, and holds potential for more effectively mobilizing clinicians to prevent prolonged labor. Appropriate on all counts…”

Click here to read the full post on the Maternova blog and learn how the “paperless partogram” works!

And while you are on the Maternova site, be sure to check out the Health Innovations page. I found the “Baby Bubbles” and the “Salad Spinner Centrifuge for Anemia” particularly interesting…

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I learned about a great resource yesterday for those working to improve the lives of women and girls, Girls Discovered: Global Maps of Adolescent Girls. The website has three main sections: Maps and Data, Sunita’s Story, and Take Action. The project is a collaborative effort of the Coalition for Adolescent Girls and Maplecroft.

The Maps and Data section has a nearly endless number of interactive maps and data sets focused on adolescent girls around the world across a number of health, education, social, economic, and population indices. Several of the maps provide interesting information about maternal health or issues impacting maternal health around the world–such as abortion legalizationage specific fertility, global anemia rates, births attended by skilled personnel, and several more.

Sunita’s Story seamlessly combines photos and narrative with maps and data to tell the personal story of one girl in India, Sunita–while also presenting the national burden and geographic distribution of the issues that she faces throughout her life. The presentation is simple and clean, making the information easy to consume.

The Take Action section has three PDF downloadable plans for taking action to address the issues of adolescent girls that are mapped on this site. There is a global action plan, a national action plan for India, and local action plan for India.

I encourage you to explore the site–it is a remarkable resource for those working on any of the various issues impacting adolescent girls and young women around the world.

Description of the project:

“The welfare of adolescent girls is crucial in determining economic and social outcomes for countries today, and in the future. For girls to become healthy mothers, productive citizens and economic contributors, their unique needs must be seen and understood.

Yet today, adolescent girls are undercounted and so underserved. Counting them is the first step to increasing their visibility.

Girls Discovered takes that first step. As a comprehensive source of maps and data on the status of adolescent girls worldwide, Girls Discovered helps donors, policy makers and implementing agencies target their investments.

This one-stop shop for information on adolescent girls is sourced from organizations operating in the public interest, and is meant for researchers, practitioners, advocates, policy-makers and the public – anyone who seeks change for the world’s 600 million adolescent girls.”

Mapping for Maternal Health:

A number of organizations have recently started using mapping technologies to provide visual representation of research and data while others are using mapping tools to link organizations working in maternal health in an effort to build a stronger and more interconnected community of maternal health professionals.

Take a look at a few of the maternal health maps I have visited recently.  Several are interactive and allow for user-generated content!

If you know of other maternal health mapping initiatives, please let me know in the comments section of this post!

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The Maternal Health Task Force currently has three interactive (and fast growing!) maternal health maps; maternal health knowledge hubs, MPH programs that offer a concentration/focus on maternal health, and maternal health organizations. As part of my role at the MHTF, I am working to spread the word about these maps and further populate them so that they can serve as useful resources for maternal health professionals and students around the world. See below for a recent blog post on the MHTF Blog with info on how to put your organization or school of public health or medicine on the maps!

The MHTF Blog

“Using geographic maps provides a global view of where maternal health activity is occurring and helps the community to understand where gaps exist. So far, we have three interactive maps on our site containing information that we hope will be useful in your work or studies; maternal health knowledge hubsMPH programs that offer a concentration/focus on maternal health, and maternal health organizations.

At the upcoming Women Deliver conference in Washington D.C. (June 7-9), we will be engaging conference participants in our mapping activities and encouraging them to put their organization or school on the map! If you are attending Women Deliver, please visit our table in the Registration Hall to map your organization or school and to see a demo of how our mapping system works.

Putting your organization on our maternal health map will help to build a growing interconnected community of maternal health organizations. It will link the important work of your organization or school with the work of maternal health organizations and schools around the globe.

If you are not attending Women Deliver, you can still get mapped! Click here to download the mapping form. Fill it out and return it to Kate Mitchell at kmitchell@engenderhealth.org.”

Also, be sure to check out Maternova’s maternal health mapping activities! Maternova is working to map clinics and hospitals with maternal health services around the globe.

Maternova

“We aim to host a global map of maternal health clinics using crowdsourcing to create an unprecedented resource and exchange mechanism for millions of frontline professionals.”

Click here to visit the Maternova maternal health map–and learn more about the initiative.

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Supported by the MacArthur Foundation, the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals (ARHP) and Maternova are partnering on a project aiming to increase access to skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care for women in Chiapas, Mexico—through the use of mobile technologies for health (mHealth).

From an email announcement I received from ARHP on Tuesday (5/11):

“All of us who care deeply about reproductive health have been closely following the conflicting data from The Lancet and the WHO on maternal mortality rates.

Regardless of the direction of global rates, we know that women in remote areas of Mexico are facing incredible challenges in giving birth safely. Patients lack a comprehensive clearinghouse directing them to local clinics or differentiating levels of care available at facilities.

With generous support from the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, ARHP and Maternova have partnered on a pilot mobile health (mHealth) initiative in Chiapas, Mexico. We are pleased to be on the leading edge of the mHealth movement, which aims to leverage the growing worldwide popularity of mobile devices to provide critical health services.

This project will create an interactive maternal health mapping tool, allowing women to find skilled providers by geographic area quickly and easily. This SmartMap will be accessible from any web-enabled device and provide detailed information about the quality and types of services offered in each clinic listed. In an emergency obstetric situation, the ability to find skilled attendants and well-equipped facilities via mobile phone can make the difference between life and death.

We are just beginning to work with our partners, Development Seed and the Comite Promotor por una Maternidad sin Riesgos (Committee for the Promotion of Safe Motherhood), on this pilot project identifying and mapping facilities in Chiapas. We are looking forward to launching the populated map by the end of 2010 and to the possibility of future stages of the project, which would make the map accessible via text message.

Get involved in this cutting-edge, lifesaving initiative:

  • Reach out to Aleya Horn at ARHP and let us know if you or your colleagues work in Chiapas, Mexico
  • Provide local contacts for collaboration or local clinics for the map
  • Make a donation to support this critical partnership and help us expand the pilot project to other underserved areas in Mexico and around the world”

Be sure to check out the Maternova blog–that highlights all sorts of innovations in maternal and neonatal health.

Posts I found especially interesting:

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In the wake of the recent maternal mortality estimates published in the Lancet, much of my time at my day job with the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) has been spent requesting and compiling reactions to the new estimates from a variety of leaders in the maternal health field.

The MHTF Blog

We tracked down responses to the new estimates from numerous maternal health organizations and professionals from a variety of disciplines including policy analysts, advocates, filmmakers, public health programmers, and researchers.  Their short blog posts provide diverse perspectives on what these new estimates really mean, the potential of the estimates to influence global health funding and policies, and recommendations for where to go from here.

Take a look at what several leading organizations and individuals had to say about the new maternal mortality estimates:

Averting Maternal Death and Disability (AMDD)

Dr. Ana Langer, EngenderHealth

Ann M. Starrs, Family Care International

Claire Bangser, Ashoka

Dr. Harshad Sanghvi, JHPIEGO

Initiative for Maternal Mortality Programme Assessment, (IMMPACT)

Jeremy Shiffman, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Lisa Russell, Governess Films and MDGfive.com

Dr. Marco Gomez, Centre for Health Policy and Innovation

Meg Wirth, Maternova

I hope you enjoy reading their responses–please let me know your thoughts!

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