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Posts Tagged ‘journalism’

The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is offering two groups of fellowships this spring: International Journalism and Global Health Reporting.

Up to five fellows will be selected for the Global Health Reporting Fellowship with the International Reporting Project. They will be given five weeks to report on a specific topic in global health such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, or maternal and child health.

“Fellows will spend two weeks in Washington at the IRP offices preparing for their overseas trips and then five weeks reporting on their chosen health topics in the country of their choice. Fellows will return to Washington for a final two weeks of reporting and presentations of their findings.”

Eligible candidates are journalists based in the United States with five years of professional experience in journalism.

The dates of the fellowship are March 3, 2011 to May 7, 2011.

Deadline to apply is December 20, 2010.

For more info, click here.

Click  here to apply!

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The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting recently identified maternal mortality as a priority issue that demands more coverage–and has made a commitment to support reporting projects that draw attention to the under-reported issue of international maternal mortality. In January, I blogged about Marco Vernaschi’s project in Guinea Bissau. The center is now supporting additional projects on maternal mortality–one in India and another in Mexico.

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

India Casts a Light on Mothers in the Dark, Hanna Ingber Win

“…This project will assess India’s efforts to improve its maternal health and explore why Assam, a northeastern state known for its beauty yet plagued by high levels of poverty, has the nation’s highest maternal mortality rate. Reporter Hanna Ingber Win will travel with boat clinics along the Brahmaputra River to visit remote villages that do not have electricity, toilets or roads, let alone health services…”

Learn more about the India project.

The Struggle for Health in Chiapas, Samuel Loewenberg

“…Samuel Loewenberg reports from two of Mexico’s poorest states, Chiapas and Oaxaca, on the social and political forces that impact the health crises affecting the poor and indigenous communities here. Chiapas and Oaxaca have the worst records in the country for maternal mortality, deaths by cervical cancer, and diarrheal illness among children. The rate of infant death for Chiapas is three times that of the natioanl average, and nearly twice as many new mothers die in Oaxaca as in wealthier parts of the country…”

Learn more about the Mexico project.

Visit the Pulitzer Center blog, Untold Stories.

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On Wednesday, the Columbia Journalism Review published a thoughtful analysis of how the media is covering the new global maternal mortality estimates published in the Lancet on Monday. The piece provides a good overview of  how a handful of major news organizations are choosing to frame the story–raising questions about why some organizations  are choosing to focus on the content of the Lancet paper, while others ere focusing more on the ‘side story’ of a group of maternal health advocates who apparently pressured the Lancet not to publish the paper ( at least not to publish it yet). The Columbia Journalism Review analysis concludes that, overall,  the reporting on this story has been “simple” and “narrowly focused.”

“…A slew of news articles this week have focused on two recent reports about the number of women who die during pregnancy or in childbirth around the world every year.

The reports don’t exactly agree, and with public health experts and heads of state meeting at the United Nations this week to discuss maternal and child health issues, it is no surprise that some squabbling over the data has emerged. Unfortunately, reporters have not provided much detail or clarity about either the squabbling or the data…”

Read the full analysis here.

What do you think about how the media is covering this story?

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A NOW team from PBS recently went to Haiti to investigate high levels of maternal mortality in the country. They happened to be in the Haiti when the earthquake hit. In collaboration with the Bureau for International Reporting (BIR), a non-profit video news production company, PBS produced Saving Haiti’s Mothers, a show that examines the state of maternal health in Haiti before the earthquake and immediately following it.

NOW on PBS

“Haiti’s catastrophic earthquake, in addition to leaving lives and institutions in ruin, also exacerbated a longtime lethal risk in Haiti: Dying during childbirth. Challenges in transportation, education, and quality health care contribute to Haiti having the highest maternal mortality rate in the Western Hemisphere, a national crisis even before the earthquake struck. While great strides are being made with global health issues like HIV/AIDS, maternal mortality figures worldwide have seen virtually no improvement in 20 years. Worldwide, over 500,000 women die each year during pregnancy. This week, a NOW team that had been working in Haiti during the earthquake reports on this deadly but correctable trend. They meet members of the Haitian Health Foundation (HHF), which operates a network of health agents in more than 100 villages, engaging in pre-natal visits, education, and emergency ambulance runs for pregnant women…”

Read the full story and watch the special here.

Learn more about Haitian Health Foundation, UNFPA, and Family Care International—all organizations featured in the show.

Visit the Bureau for International Reporting (BIR) site here.

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The Pulitzer Center recently asked readers and Twitter followers what international stories deserve more attention in the year ahead and settled on a list of five crises–including maternal mortality–to focus on in 2010.

Untold Stories: The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

” As an organization whose primary mission is to surface under-reported global issues, we know all too well that the number of such stories reaches far beyond what any short list could capture. Every month we receive proposals for stories around the world that deserve our attention. While last year we were able to support close to 50 global reporting projects, we cannot count the number of compelling proposals we had to turn down. In selecting the issues for this list that we feel are most important to highlight in the upcoming year, we focused on overarching systemic crises that we have covered and believe are important to continue covering.”
The center has decided to focus on maternal mortality, water, food insecurity, women and children issues, and fragile states in 2010.

A Focus on Maternal Mortality

“According to the World Health Organization, hundreds of thousands of women die each year from complications from childbirth due to ineffective or inaccessible health care. The Pulitzer Center has funded work on this issue with its reporting project covering maternal mortality in Guinea-Bissau and will focus on maternal mortality in more depth and across multiple regions in 2010.”

Click here for a recent post on this blog that highlights the Pulitzer Center’s current coverage of maternal mortality in Guinea-Bissau.

Click here to read more about the Pulitzer Center’s focus on food insecurity, water, women and children issues, and fragile states.

Click here to visit the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting website.

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IRIN’s humanitarian radio journalist training project has come to an end—but as the project closes, IRIN is preparing to release Veil of Tears, a collection of photos and transcribed audio testimonies on maternal mortality in Afghanistan

“In January 2010, IRIN will be launching a 60-page photo booklet on maternal mortality issues in Afghanistan, entitled Veil of Tears. The booklet is a collection of transcribed audio testimonies on loss in childbirth, as told by Afghan women, men and children, interviewed by the IRIN Radio team from 2005-2009. This collection of intimate stories gives a unique insight into today’s Afghanistan, and serves to showcase some of the important work of the IRIN Radio project…”

Read the full story here.

Visit the IRIN Humanitarian News and Analysis website here.

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Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment is the name of Marco Vernaschi’s reporting project on health care in Guinea-Bissau, supported by the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting

Vernaschi’s project is tracking the story of extremely  limited access to quality health care in Guinea-Bissau, with a focus on the issue of maternal mortality.

Take a look at his photo essay that uses images to expose what  life and death are like for pregnant women in Guinea-Bissau. These photos are some of the most powerful I have ever seen.

Click here to see the photo essay.

Also, take a look at this 30 minute video that outlines many of the factors that contribute to limited access and poor quality of care in Guinea-Bissau—and the human implications of these problems.


Click here to visit the website for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

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