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Posts Tagged ‘integration’

Horton comments on the new study, Maternal mortality for 181 countries, 1980-2008: a systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5, published today in the Lancet Online First, that suggests a dramatic reduction in global maternal mortality between 1980 and 2008. Horton describes additional significant findings in the paper–aside from the overall drop in maternal deaths. He also outlines five lessons to be learned from this paper. 

 The Lancet

“…What lessons can be drawn from these new data? First, the latest figures are, globally, good news. The provide robust reason for optimism. More importantly, these numbers should now act as a catalyst, not a brake, for accelerated action on MDG-5, including scaled-up resource commitments. Investment incontrovertibly saves the lives of women during pregnancy. 

       Second, the intimate connection between HIV and maternal health is now explicitly laid bare. Such an association, including tuberculosis, has been gaining important recent ground. This latest evidence therefore supports growing calls to integrate maternal and child survival programmes into vertical funding mechanisms for the MDGs, such as the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria…”

Read the full commentary, Maternal mortality: Surprise, hope and urgent action.

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In honor of World Health Day, I wrote a post for the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases blog, End the Neglect. The post looks at the relationship between these two historically neglected global health issues–and calls for more integration.

End the Neglect

“The theme of this year’s World Health Day is “Urbanization and Health.” Maternal mortality and morbidity, and neglected tropical diseases have a hugely debilitating impact on urban slum populations—who often lack access to health services. I would like to take this day to celebrate the increased attention to the connected issues of neglected tropical diseases and maternal health and to highlight the importance of a comprehensive, integrated approach to maternal health. This sort of approach not only includes universal access to reproductive health services but also addresses neglected tropical diseases—and their impact on maternal morbidity and mortality…”

Read the full post, Women and NTDs: Shared History, Shared Hope.

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Can integrating family planning services into HIV/AIDS treatment and care increase contraceptive use and decrease unintended pregnancy among HIV-positive women? UCSF is partnering with the Kenya Medical Research Institute and Ibis Reproductive Health to find out.

University of California, San Francisco

“’Two-thirds of the world’s HIV-infected population lives in sub-Saharan Africa and 60 percent are estimated to be women. Recent evidence suggests high rates of unintended pregnancy among HIV-infected women. Family planning is the cornerstone for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and can also reduce maternal mortality, but family planning services are not always accessible at many of the public health clinics providing HIV care and treatment,’ said the study’s primary investigator, Craig R. Cohen, MD, MPH, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at UCSF.

The research will be conducted at 18 HIV care and treatment clinics in Nyanza Province, Kenya. With 15.3 percent of its population HIV-infected, Nyanza Province has the highest seroprevalence rate amongst provinces in Kenya. These clinics are supported by the Family AIDS Care and Education Services (FACES) Program, a collaboration between UCSF and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). At 12 randomly selected clinics, HIV-infected clients will receive the intervention package of integrated family planning and HIV care. At each of the six clinic control sites, HIV-infected clients will receive standard HIV care and a referral to a separate family planning clinic within the same facility for contraceptive services.

The study’s first objective is to improve family planning clinical and counseling skills of clinicians and community health workers at all the FACES-supported HIV care and treatment clinics. A training curriculum on family planning counseling and method provision will be developed and implemented…”

Read the full news release here.

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The Maternal Health Task Force, UNFPA and the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Global Health Initiative bring you a discussion on Human Resources for Maternal Health: Midwives, TBAs, and Task-Shifting

This event is the second in the series. It will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, January 06 2010, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C.

Click here to RSVP this event.

If you are interested, but unable to attend the event, check out the live or archived webcast here.

Event Details

Extending the scope of responsibilities to non-physician health workers is potentially an important means to reducing maternal deaths in the developing world. While this strategy has proven to be an effective method for addressing human resource gaps in maternal health, pitfalls such as inadequate training and lack of coordination among key actors must be addressed.

Dr. Seble Frehywot, assistant research professor of health policy and global health at George Washington University, will address the motivation and methods for task sharing. Dr. Jeffrey Smith, regional technical director for Asia at Jhpiego, will discuss his field work experience developing workforce plans for midwives and traditional birth attendants, including in Afghanistan. Finally, Pape Gaye, president & CEO of IntraHealth, will discuss the importance of retention and other long-term strategies in human resources for maternal health.

About the Series

The reproductive and maternal health community finds itself at a critical point, drawing increased attention and funding, but still confronting more than a half million deaths each year and a high unmet need for family planning. The Policy Dialogue series seeks to galvanize the community by focusing on important–and in some cases controversial–issues within the maternal health community.

Did you miss the first event in this series?

Don’t worry! You can watch the webcast or read a report on the event! The first event in this series was held in December. The topic was Integrating HIV/AIDS and Maternal Health Services.

To view the archived webcast, click here. To read a report about the event, click here.

Click here to view Integration is all the Buzz, a previous post on this blog that highlights current news about integration of maternal health services and discusses Integrating HIV/AIDS and Maternal Health Services.

More info

Visit the Maternal Health Task Force website here.

Visit the UNFPA website here.

Visit the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Global Health Initiative site here.

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