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In my role at the Maternal Health Task Force, I am helping to coordinate a global team of guest bloggers who will write about the Global Maternal Health Conference next month–and contribute to the online dialogue around the sessions occurring at the conference. The conference will be held in New Delhi, India–but several sessions will be live-streamed. If you are attending the conference in Delhi or plan to participate remotely via live-stream and are interested in blogging, see below for details on how to join the global team of guest bloggers!

Originally posted on the MHTF Blog.

Blogging Team

Blogging is an effective communications strategy for sharing information in real time and fueling dialogue around key maternal health issues. With the Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 right around the corner, our team is looking forward to a lively online discussion around the happenings of the conference. In an effort to fuel a robust dialogue with a variety of global perspectives, we are connecting with global health and development bloggers around the world.

At this time, we are in the process of identifying a cohort of articulate guest bloggers to convey the important activities happening at the conference. If you are attending the conference (either as a presenter or a participant, either in India or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).

Guest blog posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and will be cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.

If you plan to blog about the conference on your own blog, please let us know! We would love to discuss linking to your posts and possibly cross-posting.

For more information, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).



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At a gathering of U.S. and Pakistani officials on Monday in Islamabad, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that many Pakistanis believe that U.S. involvement in Pakistan “narrowly focuses” on security issues. Clinton said that the U.S. is working to change that–and will be funding several new health and development projects in Pakistan worth over $500m over the next five years.

Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report

“…USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah said the new projects reflect Pakistani priorities and demonstrates that the U.S. “commitment is broad and deep,” Bloomberg Businessweek writes. Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. special representative to Pakistan, noted that the focus on water is the result of a specific request from Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi. “The first phase of the multi-year water program will encompass seven initiatives at a cost of $270 million and include dam irrigation projects in rural areas to control flooding, and improve water supply and quality,” the news service writes.

Another three-year $28 million health project plans to “build an obstetrics and gynecology hospital ward and training center at a hospital that handles 17,000 births a year. The health funds would also increase bed capacity at Pakistan’s largest maternity hospital, Lahore’s Lady Willingdon,” according to Bloomberg Businessweek…”

Read the full story here.

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On July 1st, the Women Deliver team announced the top five highlights from the 2010 conference (June 7-9). See below for a summary of the conference highlights–with links to publications, videos, photos, and additional information that came out of the conference.

This post was originally posted on the Women Deliver website and is reposted on MMD with permission from Women Deliver.
conference-participants.jpg

Women Deliver 2010 Conference participants

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the success of the second Women Deliver global conference. To put world leaders on notice that the time for action on maternal health is now, 3,400 advocates, policymakers, development leaders, health care professionals, youth, and media from 146 countries converged on Washington, DC on June 7-9 at Women Deliver 2010. More than 800 speeches and presentations were given at the six plenaries and 120 breakout sessions.  The heads of five UN agencies, plus the Secretary-General of the United Nations, attended. Thirty countries, UN agencies, the World Bank, corporations, and foundations helped support Women Deliver. Please see below for highlights and recaps of the conference.

1. Key Statements. Read the outcome statements from the:

2. Webcasts. Watch the videos from our plenary sessions and our press conferences, and watch Hillary Clinton’s address to the Women Deliver 2010 attendees.

3. Photos. Take a look at photos from the plenary sessions, breakout sessions and other conference events, and download them at no cost.

4. Programme. Review the plenary and breakout sessions that were held at Women Deliver 2010.

5. Publications and Advocacy Tools. Visit our Knowledge Center to download publications and advocacy tools, including:

Stay tuned for our summary report on breakout sessions by theme.

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Lagos state government, in collaboration with United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has established a media network on population and development, reproductive health rights and gender equality

AllAfrica.com

“The media network was established at the just concluded three-day workshop held at Lagos Building Investment Conference in Ikeja. Speaking at the forum, Director, Public Enlightenment, in the Ministry of Information and Strategy, Mr. Tunde Awobiyi, stated that the workshop was to empower and build the capacity of journalists to investigate and report on these three core areas (mentioned above).  He also urged journalists at the forum to develop relevant skills at the workshop to enable them to disseminate population data for development, empower women for effective management of gender-based violence and act as a catalyst for effective reproductive health and sexuality education…”

Click here to read the full story.

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