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The Safe Motherhood Program at the University of California, San Francisco is looking for two interns: one office intern to be based in the San Francisco office and one field intern to be based in the Copperbelt region of Zambia.

1.) UCSF Safe Motherhood Office Intern, San Francisco – Summer 2012

The focus of this internship is to prepare presentations for an upcoming international conference in order to effectively show the latest data on the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for obstetric hemorrhage clinical trial.  The intern will also gain some experience in handling and cleaning a large data set.

For more information on the trial please visit www.lifewrap.organd http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00488462.

Duties:

  • Assist with data cleaning and analyses for the international trial for the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for obstetric hemorrhage
  • Prepare multiple Power Point presentations to include data for an upcoming international conference
  • Other light administrative duties as required

Qualifications:

  • Excellent Power Point and writing skills are a must!
  • Knowledge of STATA, SPSS, Word, Excel.
  • Experience with online data systems is a plus.

Start date: June 1, 2012.

Duration: 12 weeks, 40 hrs/week

Note: This internship is unpaid.

Please send CV, cover letter and a writing sample to Jennifer Clark at jclark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu.

Please apply by 2/15 to be considered for initial screening.

2.) UCSF Safe Motherhood Zambia Field Intern – Summer 2012

The focus of this internship is to support the Zambia team of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) trial.  The study aims to reduce maternal mortality and morbidities in Zambia and Zimbabwe caused by obstetric hemorrhage.  This is a cluster randomized control study which compares outcomes based on evidence from intervention and control clinics.  The intervention clinics in this study are the clinics that are using the NASG as a first aid device for patients suffering from hypovolemic shock caused by bleeding during pregnancy.

For more information on the trial please visit www.lifewrap.organd http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00488462.

Duties:

  • Provide logistical support for the local Zambian team – distributing supplies, copies, etc
  • Review data collection forms
  • Encourage protocol adherence
  • Conduct training with local hospital and clinic staff
  • Visit the study clinics
  • Follow up on cases
  • Liaise with the San Francisco office and the in-country staff

Qualifications:

  • Experience in international settings
  • Interest in maternal health
  • Research experience
  • Familiarity with clinical environments
  • Must be highly detail-oriented, organized and have excellent follow-through skills

Start Date: May 30, 2012

Duration: 12 weeks, 40 hours/week

Note: Candidates are expected to secure outside funding to cover roundtrip airfare and living expenses for the duration of the internship.

Please send cv, cover letter and a writing sample to Jennifer Clark at jclark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu.

Please apply by 2/15 to be considered for initial screening!

View past intern experiences on our intern blog: http://lifewrapinterns.wordpress.com/.

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Tuesday (6/8) marked day two of Women Deliver 2010. Day two was all about innovation and (high and low) technology to improve the health of women and infants worldwide–in fact, the conference organizers marketed Tuesday’s sessions as a stand-alone symposium called Technology as a Catalyst for Social Transformation.

Take a look at two examples of technologies that were discussed at the conference on Tuesday…

Microbicide Vaginal Rings (High Tech)

“The nonprofit International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM) today announced the initiation of the first trial among women in Africa testing a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral drug (ARV) that could one day be used to prevent HIV transmission during sex. The clinical trial, known as IPM 015, tests the safety and acceptability of an innovative approach that adapts a successful technology from the reproductive health field to give women around the world a tool to protect themselves from HIV infection…”

Read the full press release here.

Clean Delivery Kits (Low Tech)

Clean Birth Kits–Potential to Deliver?, a publication supported by Save the Children/Saving Newborn Lives, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Immpact (University of Aberdeen), and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth, was released at a session at Women Deliver yesterday. The session was chaired by Claudia Morrissey of Save the Children; moderated by Richard Horton, Editor of the Lancet; and presenters included Wendy Graham of University of Aberdeen, and Haris Ahmed of PAIMAN. The goal of the session was to summarise the evidence base for clean delivery kits, discuss practical implementation experiences from the field, and to have a lively debate on the “risks” associated with promoting birth kits. The report will be available online soon.

Subscribe to the MHTF Blog for updates on this project/report–as well as updates on other MHTF projects and commentary on a variety of maternal health issues.

Check out a recent blog post, A Good Idea or an Expensive Diversion: Workshop on the Evidence Base for Clean Birth Kits, by Ann Blanc, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force, on a workshop leading up to the new report on delivery kits.

Click here for the webcast of a session at Women Deliver 2010 that explores “What’s on the Horizon” for new technologies in contraception.

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