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Posts Tagged ‘childbirth’

On May 27th, Sarah Boseley reported on her Global Health Blog that the families of two women who died in childbirth have taken legal action against the Ugandan government, asserting that the women’s rights to life and health were violated.

Sarah Boseley’s Global Health Blog, The Guardian

“…The case is unprecedented in Uganda. Aid agencies and medical charities and donor governments can condemn the death toll in pregnancy and childbirth, but the most powerful argument is the devastating testimony of those who suffer.

Sylvia Nalubowa died in Mityana hospital on 10 August 2009 from the complications of obstructed labour. She was carrying twins, one of whom was delivered. The second died with her. Jennifer Anguko died in Arua regional referral hospital on 10 December 2010 when her uterus finally ruptured after 15 hours of obstructed labour. Her status as a district councillor brought her no favours – she was said to be the fourth woman to die in that hospital that day…”

Read the full story here.

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Today, May 5th, is International Day of the Midwife—and UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives have released a joint statement calling on world leaders to address the shortage of 350,000 midwives around the world. Their statement explains that increased investments in training midwives are critical to reaching the most marginalized communities–who typically lack access to health services.

UNFPA

“…The UNFPA and ICM point out that midwives can prevent up to 90 per cent of maternal deaths where they are authorized to practice their competencies and play a full role during pregnancy, childbirth and after birth. They have a critical role in providing family planning, counselling, and preventing HIV transmission from mother to child.

As the world gears up for the 10-year review of the Millennium Development Goals, both organizations will be campaigning to increase funding for goals 4, 5 and 6 to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health and combat HIV and AIDS.

We look forward to the high-level Midwifery Symposium from 5 to 6 June in Washington, D.C., immediately preceding the Women Deliver Conference. The symposium aims to raise awareness around the core role of midwifery services in achieving MDGs 4, 5 and 6; address challenges in global standards on education and regulation of midwives; and strengthen midwifery services…”

Read the full statement.

Also, take a look at this video statement of the President of the International Confederation of Midwives, Bridget Lynch.

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Sarah Boseley reflects on the new maternal mortality estimates published today in the Lancet. She talks with Chris Murray , Director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington, about his research–and raises tough questions regarding the implications of the new data. For example: “Does it mean we need more money for maternal health or less?”

 Sarah Boseley’s Global Health Blog

“…It’s remarkable news – and all the more remarkable because it’s been happening without anyone realising it. It’s like waking up and finding somebody has demolished the ugly old building across the road and planted trees instead. Hard to believe the scenery has changed quite so dramatically. The new optimistic outlook will take some getting used to. This is what Dr Murray told me.

The whole community has been living off 500,000 women dying a year for the last 30 years. That’s fed a sense of almost pessimism that it is difficult to change maternal mortality.

Murray and colleagues have got new data, that has not been systematically put together in the past, and new tools…”

Read the full story, Saving Women’s Lives in Childbirth–It’s More Possible Than We Thought.

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Today’s story on Time.com, Too Many Women Dying in U.S. While Having Babies, describes a new report by Amnesty International called, Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Health Care Crisis in the USA.

www.Time.com

“Amnesty International may be best known to American audiences for bringing to light horror stories overseas such as the disappearance of political activists in Argentina or the abysmal conditions inside South African prisons under apartheid. But in a new report on pregnancy and childbirth care in the U.S., Amnesty details the maternal health care crisis in this country as part of a systemic violation of women’s rights…”

Read the full story.

Download the report and view the press release.

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Too Young , Too Late and Too Far recently premiered in Lagos, Nigeria

The films, produced by Communicating for Change (CFC), were shot in the ‘Nollywood’ style which involves a combination of suspense and drama—but the project team also included health expert script consultants, Dr Boniface Oye Adeniran, Obstetrician/Gynecologist of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) and Dr Babatunde Ahonsi, formerly of the Ford Foundation.

“The films: Too Young, Too Far, and Too Late, take a provocative look at the life-threatening conditions that pregnant women face in Nigeria while also revealing their struggles with matters of bias against gender, abortion and childbirth as well as the corresponding challenges faced by husbands, boyfriends and families, who have to deal with their own hopes, frustrations and fears.”

Read the full story about Too Young, Too Far, and Too Late here.

For more information about Communicating for Change, click here.

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