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Posts Tagged ‘child mortality’

The official launch of the Countdown to 2015 Decade Report (2000-2010) will be at the Women Deliver and Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival conferences next week (the Countdown meeting is being held in conjunction with Women Deliver) –but the report is now available to download on the Countdown to 2015 website.

Countdown to 2015-Maternal, Newborn, and Child Survival

From the report:

“The Countdown report for 2010 contains good news–many countries are making progress, reducing mortality and increasing coverage of effective health interventions at an accelerating pace. But the news is not all good. Many Countdown countries are still off track for achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 (reduce child mortality) and 5 (improve maternal health) and are not increasing coverage of key health interventions quickly enough…”

Click here to download the report and/or the brochure with highlights from the report.

Click here for a press release on the new report.

Click here for a special message from Countdown for conference participants about the special track at Women Deliver for Countdown to 2015 sessions.

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AllAfrica.com reports that the Nutrition Society of Nigeria is calling for a review of the current national food and nutrition policy—stating that malnutrition accounts for 60% of avoidable maternal, child and infant mortality in Nigeria

allAfrica.com

President of the Nutrition Society of Nigeria, Professor Ignatius Onimawo spoke at the opening ceremony of the 21st anniversary of the Food Basket Foundation International Initiative at the University of Ibadan. He described malnutrition as a major silent killer in Nigeria and said, “It is instructive to know that of the over 100 universities currently operating in Nigeria only five run degree courses in nutrition and yet nutrition holds the key for the reversal of the vicious attack of these deadly diseases.”

Read the full story here

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Cambodian News reports that while Cambodia’s health system has improved over the past decade, maternal mortality has seen no real improvement. 

Cambodian News

“Cambodia’s health system has improved over the past decade resulting in significant reduction of child mortality, reduction of mortality and morbidity due to communicable diseases such as HIV/ AIDS, TB and malaria, vaccine preventable diseases, and improvement in fertility rate and life expectancy.

Despite these improvements, Cambodia still faces challenges. There has been no improvement in maternal mortality (472 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 2005); the lack of sanitation and access to clean water are continuing problems; the level of malnutrition is high (stunting at 37% among children under 5); chronic non-communicable diseases and injuries from road traffic accidents are on the increase; and significant inequalities in health outcomes between the rich and the poor, and urban and rural.

High level of out-of-pocket expenditure leads to problems of affordability in accessing services. In addition there are physical constraints to access for remote, and rural populations…”

Read the full story, Improvements in Health Services for the Poor

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Elizabeth Payne, Editorial Board member of the Ottawa Citizen, outlines a plan/suggestion by Keith Martin, medical doctor and maternal health expert, for G8 countries to tackle maternal mortality in developing countries.

Ottawa Citizen

“…Martin says the federal government must articulate exactly what it is going to do when it comes to the G8 maternal health initiative and access to reproductive technology. ‘I hope they don’t take an ideological position.’

Harper will be ‘turning back the clock,’ Martin says, if the initiative does not include reproductive health: ‘I can’t think of another country that would take that position.’

But, he adds, the initiative is too crucial to be lost because of political debate. There is a way Canada can lead a ‘pragmatic, effective plan’ without having to directly support abortions or contraceptives.

Martin suggests each of the G8 countries could take on a different aspect of the campaign to reduce maternal and child mortality.

‘It would be a way for the conservative government to make sure what comes out of the G8 is a plan that is implemented rather than talked about,’ he said.

In order to reduce maternal mortality rates, he says, a G8 initiative should include training of primary care workers, access to medications, diagnostics, clean water, access to power, access to family planning and nutrition, particularly micro-nutrients…”

Read the full story, How to help women, and avoid abortion politics.

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Five years until the 2015 UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) deadline and health care professionals have warned that the country is unlikely to reach its maternal and child health goals

Reuters AlertNet

Health care proffesionals in Pakistan acknowledge that the government has implemented several health initiatives to address MDG4 and 5—such as the Lady Health Visitor Programme which appears to be quite successful in rural areas—but issues like corruption, conflict, inadequate funding and a lack of monitoring and evaluation of programs are forcing Pakistan to fall behind in achieving the MDGs.

Read the full story here.

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