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Posts Tagged ‘Millennium Development Goals’

On Tuesday, September 14th, the Guardian launched a new website in collaboration with the Gates Foundation. The site is dedicated entirely to global development, was built with the Millennium Development Goals as a framework, and launched just one week before the UN Summit.

Be sure to check out the following components of the new site:

See below for the press release about the new site:

The Guardian today has launched a new website in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help focus the world’s attention on global development. The site will provide a new space for discussion and interaction on the biggest challenges affecting the lives of billions of people across the developing world, including poverty, hunger, infant mortality, adaptation to climate change and economic development.

One aim of the website, which launches just a week before a major UN summit, is to hold governments, institutions and NGOs accountable for the implementation of the United Nations millennium development goals (MDGs), which 192 countries signed up to in 2000. Huge advances have been made with many of the MDGs, and the new site will enable people around the world to better monitor how each country is performing.

For the first time, individuals will be able to access a central data store using the world’s top sources for development and aid data, through which they can access development statistics, and information. For example, users will be able to find out who has given the most aid to Pakistan, or which countries have the highest Aids rates.

Alan Rusbridger, Editor-in-Chief, Guardian News & Media, said: “All too often the mainstream press ignores long-term development stories. However, it is essential to have a place where some of the biggest questions facing humanity are analysed and debated, and through which we can monitor the effectiveness of the billions of pounds of aid that flows annually into the developing world. The creation of this website is a natural step for the Guardian, which has always been internationalist in its outlook and passionate about social justice.”

Kate James, Chief Communications Officer for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is part-funding the site along with Guardian News & Media, said: ” We are excited to be working with the Guardian on this unique project – creating a global hub for information, debate and action around global development. We welcome the Guardian’s commitment to bringing together and galvanizing the community engaged on these issues and believe that, in doing so, this hub can play an important role in putting a spotlight on global health and development.”

The website features the best of the Guardian’s writers on development, including Madeleine Bunting, Sarah Boseley, Larry Elliott and John Vidal, as well as bringing together a selection of the most distinctive development blogs from around the world and a monthly ‘Poverty Matters’ podcast. In keeping with guardian.co.uk’s mutualisation strategy, the website will focus on linked reporting and response, giving readers the ability to follow conversations and debates, compare sources and links, and get involved.

It is also being supported by more than 20 of the world’s leading development experts, including Nobel prize winner Amartya Sen and American economist and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Jeff Sachs.

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The Kaiser Family Foundation is holding a policy forum (open to the public) where experts will comment on progress toward achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5–and explore the role of the U.S. in improving global maternal and child health. The event will take place on May 24th, from 9:30am to 11:00am ET at the Foundation’s Washington D.C. office.

The Kaiser Family Foundation

“…Recently published data from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) show some progress in improving maternal health globally in recent years, though substantially more progress will be needed to achieve the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals for reducing child mortality and improving maternal health by 2015...

…The expert panel discussion will include Jennifer Klein, senior advisor on global women’s issues at the U.S. Department of State; Flavia Bustreo, director, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, World Health Organization; Ana Langer, president, EngenderHealth; Christopher J.L. Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington; and Jen Kates, vice president and director of Global Health Policy and HIV, Kaiser Family Foundation.  Foundation Executive Vice President Diane Rowland will moderate…”

For event details and information on how to RSVP, click here. You will also find information on how to view the archived webcast of the event.

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Today, May 5th, is International Day of the Midwife—and UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives have released a joint statement calling on world leaders to address the shortage of 350,000 midwives around the world. Their statement explains that increased investments in training midwives are critical to reaching the most marginalized communities–who typically lack access to health services.

UNFPA

“…The UNFPA and ICM point out that midwives can prevent up to 90 per cent of maternal deaths where they are authorized to practice their competencies and play a full role during pregnancy, childbirth and after birth. They have a critical role in providing family planning, counselling, and preventing HIV transmission from mother to child.

As the world gears up for the 10-year review of the Millennium Development Goals, both organizations will be campaigning to increase funding for goals 4, 5 and 6 to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health and combat HIV and AIDS.

We look forward to the high-level Midwifery Symposium from 5 to 6 June in Washington, D.C., immediately preceding the Women Deliver Conference. The symposium aims to raise awareness around the core role of midwifery services in achieving MDGs 4, 5 and 6; address challenges in global standards on education and regulation of midwives; and strengthen midwifery services…”

Read the full statement.

Also, take a look at this video statement of the President of the International Confederation of Midwives, Bridget Lynch.

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In honor of World Health Day, I wrote a post for the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases blog, End the Neglect. The post looks at the relationship between these two historically neglected global health issues–and calls for more integration.

End the Neglect

“The theme of this year’s World Health Day is “Urbanization and Health.” Maternal mortality and morbidity, and neglected tropical diseases have a hugely debilitating impact on urban slum populations—who often lack access to health services. I would like to take this day to celebrate the increased attention to the connected issues of neglected tropical diseases and maternal health and to highlight the importance of a comprehensive, integrated approach to maternal health. This sort of approach not only includes universal access to reproductive health services but also addresses neglected tropical diseases—and their impact on maternal morbidity and mortality…”

Read the full post, Women and NTDs: Shared History, Shared Hope.

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Screenshot from Women Deliver conference website.

 

Women Deliver 

Volunteer at the conference and receive free registration for the conference, including three days of panel presentations and breakout sessions; access to Tuesday’s Technology Symposium and to the Exhibition Hall; and a Women Deliver volunteer t-shirt.

The conference will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington DC from June 7th to the 9th, 2010. The deadline to apply to volunteer is March 31st, 2010.

For details on eligibility and information on the various volunteer assignments, click here!

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Immpact is looking for a researcher to conduct a scientific literature review of the quality of international maternal health care—and prepare proposals/implementation of formative research studies to improve quality of maternal health services in developing countries.

Immpact

Screenshot from Immpact website.

About Immpact and their current research activities

Immpact is a research unit at the University of Aberdeen with a focus on knowledge generation, knowledge management and knowledge transfer dedicated to reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity in developing countries. This is a global research initiative whose aim is to promote better health and is closely linked with global efforts to meet the UN Millennium Development Goals for 2015, especially those related to maternal mortality reduction.

Immpact has recently been awarded funding by the Norwegian Government to conduct multiple research activities related to improving the quality of maternal care in developing countries, including systematic literature reviews, formative research and developing a large-scale international field trial testing package of quality of delivery care interventions including birth kits.    The current focus of the research project is India and a few selected African countries.

This initiative will contribute to the better conceptual understanding of quality of care available via maternal health services and will generate evidence on the means improving maternal care in the context of developing countries.

The study will improve the quality of delivery care and strengthen health systems, and thus impact upon maternal mortality. The key potential outputs will be:

  • Scientific literature reviews to describe status of quality of maternal care and to identify the effective health systems interventions in developing countries.
  • Prioritisation and pre-testing of promising targeted interventions through series of formative research activities
  • Robust evaluation of the quality of a delivery care intervention package in target developing countries”

Download the full job description here.

See the online posting here.

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The government of Sierra Leone has announced an end to health center user fees for pregnant women, lactating mothers, and children under five. Questions remain regarding the multiple factors that contribute to maternal death in Sierra Leone.

IRIN Humanitarian News and Analysis

In this story, IRIN Humanitarian News and Analysis takes a closer look at the issue of maternal mortality and raises concerns regarding the various factors leading to extremely high levels of maternal mortality in Sierra Leone, factors that will likely not be addressed by a quick-fix abolition of user fees.

“…C.T.H. Bell, a gynaecologist with the privately owned New Life hospital in Sierra Leone’s capital, Freetown, says that more critical than free treatment is speed of decision-making in the home, an efficient transport infrastructure, and prompt treatment on arrival at a health centre…

…Monir Islam, head of WHO’s Making Pregnancies Safer Programme, told IRIN poor roads and a lack of ambulances made it hard for people from rural areas to get to a city for emergency care. ‘Free care means little on its own. If women cannot make it to a centre, what good is free care?’…”

Read the full story, Free Care for Expectant Mothers: Is it Enough?

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