Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘global health’

The Safe Motherhood Program at UCSF is looking for interns to work in the Copperbelt of Zambia from August – October, 2011.

Interested? Check out the details below!

This internship is based in the Copperbelt Region of Zambia.  The intern will work on a study which aims to reduce maternal mortality and morbidities in Zambia and Zimbabwe caused by obstetric hemorrhage.  This is a cluster randomized control study which compares outcomes based on evidence from intervention and control clinics.  The intervention clinics in this study are the clinics that are using the NASG (Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment) as a first aid device for patients suffering from hypovolemic shock caused by bleeding during pregnancy.

Some of the duties of the intern are:

  • Providing logistic support for the local Zambian team – distributing supplies, copies
  • Reviewing data collection forms
  • Encouraging protocol adherence
  • Conducting training with local hospital and clinic staff
  • Visiting the study clinics
  • Following up on cases
  • Liaising with the San Francisco office and the in-country staff

Desired qualifications:  Experience in international settings, interest in maternal health, research experience, familiarity with clinical environments.  Must be highly detail- oriented, be well-organized and have excellent follow-through skills.

Note: This internship is unpaid. Intern must provide their own airfare and living expenses.

To apply, send cover letter and cv to:

Elizabeth Butrick

NASG Project Director

ebutrick@globalhealth.ucsf.edu

Read Full Post »

On May 27th, Sarah Boseley reported on her Global Health Blog that the families of two women who died in childbirth have taken legal action against the Ugandan government, asserting that the women’s rights to life and health were violated.

Sarah Boseley’s Global Health Blog, The Guardian

“…The case is unprecedented in Uganda. Aid agencies and medical charities and donor governments can condemn the death toll in pregnancy and childbirth, but the most powerful argument is the devastating testimony of those who suffer.

Sylvia Nalubowa died in Mityana hospital on 10 August 2009 from the complications of obstructed labour. She was carrying twins, one of whom was delivered. The second died with her. Jennifer Anguko died in Arua regional referral hospital on 10 December 2010 when her uterus finally ruptured after 15 hours of obstructed labour. Her status as a district councillor brought her no favours – she was said to be the fourth woman to die in that hospital that day…”

Read the full story here.

Read Full Post »

The Global Health Corps is now accepting applications for their fellowship placements in Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, and the USA.

I learned about this opportunity from Emily Bearse, a GHC fellowship alum, current GHC staff member, and grad school buddy of mine!  Here is what Emily had to say about it:

“Being a GHC alum from their inaugural class as well as working on their staff team now, I truly believe GHC has a great model and the power to build the movement for global health equity. We are built on a unique partnership model where we work with existing organizations addressing pressing issues in under-served communities. We partner one national with one international fellow at each site to promote knowledge sharing and synergies in order to create deeper impacts in the communities where fellows serve. We engage people from outside the traditional health space in order to bring valuable expertise to strengthen health systems.”

Emily also mentioned that GHC is offering several placements with Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Millennium Villages Project, and mothers2mothers–organizations with a strong focus on maternal and child health.

Excerpt from the press release:

“Global Health Corps is expanding this year to support 70 emerging leaders in their 2011-2012 fellowship class. Applications for placements in Burundi, Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda and the USA are now open at www.apply.ghcorps.org.  GHC is seeking applicants with diverse skill-sets from areas that are often viewed as outside of the traditional health workforce—managers, communicators, architects, computer scientists, supply chain analysts and other exceptional young people from disciplines important to building strong health systems.

‘The complexity and scope of today’s challenges requires people with diverse skills from a wide range of fields beyond medicine. To truly shift the tide of global health challenges, we need to engage young leaders from all backgrounds.’ Barbara Bush, cofounder and CEO said.

Global Health Corps aims to mobilize a global community of emerging leaders to build the movement for global health equity. GHC does this by providing young leaders year long paid fellowships with outstanding organizations working on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity…”

Read the full press release here.

For more info about the Global Health Corps, click here.

Read Full Post »

The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is offering two groups of fellowships this spring: International Journalism and Global Health Reporting.

Up to five fellows will be selected for the Global Health Reporting Fellowship with the International Reporting Project. They will be given five weeks to report on a specific topic in global health such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, or maternal and child health.

“Fellows will spend two weeks in Washington at the IRP offices preparing for their overseas trips and then five weeks reporting on their chosen health topics in the country of their choice. Fellows will return to Washington for a final two weeks of reporting and presentations of their findings.”

Eligible candidates are journalists based in the United States with five years of professional experience in journalism.

The dates of the fellowship are March 3, 2011 to May 7, 2011.

Deadline to apply is December 20, 2010.

For more info, click here.

Click  here to apply!

Read Full Post »

Colleagues at the Women’s Health and Empowerment Center of Expertise at the University of California Global Health Institute are working to develop a multidisciplinary book on women’s health and empowerment.  The book will feature a set of case studies that examine the application of a specific disciplinary (or multi-discplinary) approach to addressing issues of women’s health and empowerment.  The book is being designed as a textbook to be used in undergraduate and graduate programs focused on global health, women’s studies, development studies, medical anthropology, sociology and other related disciplines. See below for the call for abstracts and case study nomination form.

Call for Abstracts

Women’s Health &Empowerment (WH&E) COE

Purpose:

The WH&E COE believes that advances in women’s health globally are impeded by poverty, limited access to educational and economic opportunities, gender bias and discrimination, unjust laws, and insufficient state accountability. These forces intersect to restrict access to vital women’s health services and the information that women need to improve their lives. By prioritizing women’s health concerns, rights, and empowerment, this COE is uniquely poised to catalyze societal-level changes that will yield sustainable improvements in health and well-being for women on a global scale.

Mission:

We envision a world in which all women and girls are empowered and healthy. Our mission is to promote justice, equity and scientific advances to reduce gender and health disparities globally. Grounded in human rights principles, our approach is interdisciplinary and transformative.  Through innovative research, education and international collaboration, we build and strengthen the capacity of the next generation of leaders in women’s health and empowerment. Our core activities focus on assuring safe motherhood, reducing violence against women, improving access to family planning and reproductive technologies, advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights, preventing HIV/AIDS, and reducing environmental threats to women’s health.

Book Project

The WH&E COE is developing a multi-disciplinary book of case studies that address the intersection of scholarship and practice in two areas: women’s health and women’s empowerment.  The book will document innovative research and programmatic efforts in the field and will strive to capture and define the latest thinking within the interlinked areas of women’s health and empowerment.  Each chapter will include a “lead-in” section written by an expert in the specific chapter discipline and incorporate one or more cases to effectively document the “real world” experience of the intervention or study.

Each abstract must consider both women’s health and empowerment. The book will be designed as a textbook in undergraduate and graduate programs focused on global health, women’s studies, development studies, medical anthropology, sociology and other related disciplines. Questions at the end of each chapter will aid in learner assessment and enhance the utility of the text in the classroom.

We are eliciting abstracts from authors interested in contributing to this multi-disciplinary textbook.  Abstracts will be screened as below and the selected authors will be asked to contribute to a chapter for this book project in consultation with its editors over the 2011-2012 calendar year.  Travel stipends for case study completion may be available.

Abstract Objectives

1.     Features innovative field research and/or programs that address the intersection of women’s health and empowerment,

2.     Facilitates students’ learning about the interrelated nature of women’s health and empowerment,

3.     Documents major lessons learned from these projects, including challenges and failures, and

4.     Includes an assessment of how the specific effort has been effective or ineffective and clearly analyzes the reasons for its success or lack thereof.

Abstract Guidelines

  • An abstract of no more than 500 words should state the premise of the case study (principal research question/hypothesis or programmatic intervention), discuss its significance, and describe the methods and data sources.
  • If the case is based on a partnership, state the manner in which partners will be included in the development of the case study.  Considering the audience for the book will be from multiple disciplines, both academics and practitioners, abstracts should avoid disciplinary jargon to promote inclusivity.
  • Your curriculum vitae (4 pages maximum)

Review Process & Criteria

All submitted abstracts will go through an initial screening review. Based upon the initial review, the author will be contacted with questions of clarification and initial feedback.  For abstracts that successfully pass the initial screening, authors may submit a “revised” abstract that incorporates requested revisions.  Each first-round selected abstract will be presented to the COE members during a mid-November 2010 meeting.  The presentations will be done either in person or electronically.  The final abstract selections will contribute significantly to the formulation of the individual book chapters.

The abstracts will be rated upon the:

1.     Innovative contribution to women’s health and empowerment,

2.     Comprehensiveness of argument and analysis,

3.     Capacity to communicate cutting edge research and/or programmatic intervention,

4.     Strength of evaluation of the documented success or failure,

5.     Inclusion of the perspectives and engagement of the population that stands to benefit from research or program, and

6.     Proposed recommendations.

Deadlines

All abstracts must be submitted by 5:00 PM (Pacific Time) on October 15, 2010.  Abstracts should be sent to Katie Gifford (giffordk@obgyn.ucsf.edu) and be in a Word document format.  If you would like to discuss a concept prior to submission, please contact Katie Gifford at the above email address.

Nomination of Case Concept

Click here for the nomination form.  Please use the form to nominate case concepts of particular interest.  The COE will follow up directly with the nominee contact to facilitate full abstract development.

Read Full Post »

In my role at the Maternal Health Task Force, I am helping to coordinate a global team of guest bloggers who will write about the Global Maternal Health Conference next month–and contribute to the online dialogue around the sessions occurring at the conference. The conference will be held in New Delhi, India–but several sessions will be live-streamed. If you are attending the conference in Delhi or plan to participate remotely via live-stream and are interested in blogging, see below for details on how to join the global team of guest bloggers!

Originally posted on the MHTF Blog.

Blogging Team

Blogging is an effective communications strategy for sharing information in real time and fueling dialogue around key maternal health issues. With the Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 right around the corner, our team is looking forward to a lively online discussion around the happenings of the conference. In an effort to fuel a robust dialogue with a variety of global perspectives, we are connecting with global health and development bloggers around the world.

At this time, we are in the process of identifying a cohort of articulate guest bloggers to convey the important activities happening at the conference. If you are attending the conference (either as a presenter or a participant, either in India or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).

Guest blog posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and will be cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.

If you plan to blog about the conference on your own blog, please let us know! We would love to discuss linking to your posts and possibly cross-posting.

For more information, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).



Read Full Post »

I learned about a great resource yesterday for those working to improve the lives of women and girls, Girls Discovered: Global Maps of Adolescent Girls. The website has three main sections: Maps and Data, Sunita’s Story, and Take Action. The project is a collaborative effort of the Coalition for Adolescent Girls and Maplecroft.

The Maps and Data section has a nearly endless number of interactive maps and data sets focused on adolescent girls around the world across a number of health, education, social, economic, and population indices. Several of the maps provide interesting information about maternal health or issues impacting maternal health around the world–such as abortion legalizationage specific fertility, global anemia rates, births attended by skilled personnel, and several more.

Sunita’s Story seamlessly combines photos and narrative with maps and data to tell the personal story of one girl in India, Sunita–while also presenting the national burden and geographic distribution of the issues that she faces throughout her life. The presentation is simple and clean, making the information easy to consume.

The Take Action section has three PDF downloadable plans for taking action to address the issues of adolescent girls that are mapped on this site. There is a global action plan, a national action plan for India, and local action plan for India.

I encourage you to explore the site–it is a remarkable resource for those working on any of the various issues impacting adolescent girls and young women around the world.

Description of the project:

“The welfare of adolescent girls is crucial in determining economic and social outcomes for countries today, and in the future. For girls to become healthy mothers, productive citizens and economic contributors, their unique needs must be seen and understood.

Yet today, adolescent girls are undercounted and so underserved. Counting them is the first step to increasing their visibility.

Girls Discovered takes that first step. As a comprehensive source of maps and data on the status of adolescent girls worldwide, Girls Discovered helps donors, policy makers and implementing agencies target their investments.

This one-stop shop for information on adolescent girls is sourced from organizations operating in the public interest, and is meant for researchers, practitioners, advocates, policy-makers and the public – anyone who seeks change for the world’s 600 million adolescent girls.”

Mapping for Maternal Health:

A number of organizations have recently started using mapping technologies to provide visual representation of research and data while others are using mapping tools to link organizations working in maternal health in an effort to build a stronger and more interconnected community of maternal health professionals.

Take a look at a few of the maternal health maps I have visited recently.  Several are interactive and allow for user-generated content!

If you know of other maternal health mapping initiatives, please let me know in the comments section of this post!

Read Full Post »

If you are interested in and skilled at using various forms of social media to increase the visibility of an organization or raise awareness for a cause–and also have a solid understanding of global sexual and reproductive health issues, you might want to take a look at this newly created job at EngenderHealth in New York City!
Excerpt from Job Description:

“…Working with the entire Communications and Marketing (C & M) Team, the Copywriter/Social Media Associate is responsible for conceptualizing and writing an array of communications and promotional materials, and growing EngenderHealth’s presence in the blogosphere and social media. The Copywriter/Social Media Associate is responsible for translating technical information into understandable and compelling language that will inform, appeal to and inspire multiple audiences (e.g., donors, professional audiences, media, and the general public). The Copywriter/Social Media Associate undertakes research to develop story ideas, and produces well-researched, lucid content for a variety of communications vehicles, such as brochures, newsletters, and online platforms.

The Copywriter/Social Media Associate will work closely with the Director and Manager of the Communications and Marketing Department to develop promotional and communication dissemination plans, and assist in the implementation of communications and marketing campaigns. The Copywriter/Social Media Associate will spend up to 40% of his/her time managing social media efforts to grow EngenderHealth’s online presence in this area. He/she will report directly to the Manager of Communications & Marketing…”

Learn more about the job and apply here.

Read Full Post »

I attended a press conference yesterday (6/17) where Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth announced the 16 winners of the Young Champions for Maternal Health competition. The 16 Young Champions come from 13 different countries and will be placed with Ashoka Fellows around the world for a 9-month mentorship.

Excerpt from my post on the MHTF Blog:

“…Tim Thomas explained that improving global maternal health is a persistent challenge—and one that will need to be tackled via multiple sectors. Tim pointed out that the Young Champions have big and innovative ideas for improving maternal health—and that the Ashoka Fellows will play a crucial role in teaching the Champions about social entrepreneurship, building sustainable infrastructure, and how to ‘scale-up’ global health projects—so that their big ideas can result in real and lasting impact.

A big idea is precisely what Yeabsira Mehari has—and she looks forward to tapping into Glory Alexander’s wisdom to develop the idea. Yeabsira aspires to set up a fistula care center in Ethiopia that will address both the health needs of the women affected by fistula as well as the economic and socio-cultural effects of fistula. Her dream is to establish a fistula care center that will prepare women to be social entrepreneurs themselves–by providing them with midwifery training and/or small business development training as well as offering micro-loans to get their businesses off the ground.

Ashoka India Fellow Glory Alexander works to end stigma and discrimination associated with HIV/AIDS in India. Her organization, ASHA Foundation, focuses on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS and primary prevention for vulnerable women.   Aside from learning about social entrepreneurship, sustainability, and ‘scale-up’, Yeabsira is excited to work with Glory to develop expertise in engaging with and helping to empower stigmatized populations. She anticipates that many of the lessons she will learn from working with HIV/AIDS patients in India will be transferable to working with fistula patients in Ethiopia…”

Read my full post on the MHTF Blog.

Read Full Post »

The Kaiser Family Foundation is holding a policy forum (open to the public) where experts will comment on progress toward achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5–and explore the role of the U.S. in improving global maternal and child health. The event will take place on May 24th, from 9:30am to 11:00am ET at the Foundation’s Washington D.C. office.

The Kaiser Family Foundation

“…Recently published data from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) show some progress in improving maternal health globally in recent years, though substantially more progress will be needed to achieve the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals for reducing child mortality and improving maternal health by 2015...

…The expert panel discussion will include Jennifer Klein, senior advisor on global women’s issues at the U.S. Department of State; Flavia Bustreo, director, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, World Health Organization; Ana Langer, president, EngenderHealth; Christopher J.L. Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington; and Jen Kates, vice president and director of Global Health Policy and HIV, Kaiser Family Foundation.  Foundation Executive Vice President Diane Rowland will moderate…”

For event details and information on how to RSVP, click here. You will also find information on how to view the archived webcast of the event.

Read Full Post »

Tonight at 8pm (ET) the ONE campaign will hold an interactive conference call on maternal health with the President of ONE, David Lane, and supermodel/maternal health activist, Christy Turlington Burns, who recently screened her new film on maternal health, No Woman, No Cry, at the Tribeca Film Festival. Christy will also participate in a panel at Women Deliver about the role of media in raising awareness for global health issues.

Women Deliver News

Letter from Christy Turlington Burns to ONE members:

I recently traveled to Africa with ONE, and I want to tell you about what I saw there and what it means for our work empowering women globally to fight poverty and disease. May I give you a ring at 8 PM (ET) this Thursday, May 13, for an interactive conference call? Let me know by RSVPing with your phone number here: David Lane, ONE’s president and CEO, will be joining us on this call. We have exciting news to share with you about ONE’s budget campaign, the Women ONE2ONE initiative, and programs promoting the health and well-being of African women and children. And of course, you’ll have a chance to ask us questions and learn how to get more involved with ONE. All I need is your number and ONE’s conference call technology will do the rest. You’ll just have to answer your phone at 8 PM (ET) on Thursday. And if you want, you can also follow along through a video feed on ONE’s website. Later this week, we’ll send you a link to the conference call website where you can see David and me on video, submit questions, chat with other ONE members and more. So watch your email for that!

Talk to you soon,

Christy Turlington Burns
ONE Member

Click here for information on how to join the call.

Click here to visit Every Mother Counts, the new maternal health website launched with the film, No Woman No Cry.

Read Full Post »

In the wake of the recent maternal mortality estimates published in the Lancet, much of my time at my day job with the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) has been spent requesting and compiling reactions to the new estimates from a variety of leaders in the maternal health field.

The MHTF Blog

We tracked down responses to the new estimates from numerous maternal health organizations and professionals from a variety of disciplines including policy analysts, advocates, filmmakers, public health programmers, and researchers.  Their short blog posts provide diverse perspectives on what these new estimates really mean, the potential of the estimates to influence global health funding and policies, and recommendations for where to go from here.

Take a look at what several leading organizations and individuals had to say about the new maternal mortality estimates:

Averting Maternal Death and Disability (AMDD)

Dr. Ana Langer, EngenderHealth

Ann M. Starrs, Family Care International

Claire Bangser, Ashoka

Dr. Harshad Sanghvi, JHPIEGO

Initiative for Maternal Mortality Programme Assessment, (IMMPACT)

Jeremy Shiffman, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Lisa Russell, Governess Films and MDGfive.com

Dr. Marco Gomez, Centre for Health Policy and Innovation

Meg Wirth, Maternova

I hope you enjoy reading their responses–please let me know your thoughts!

Read Full Post »

Sarah Boseley reflects on the new maternal mortality estimates published today in the Lancet. She talks with Chris Murray , Director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington, about his research–and raises tough questions regarding the implications of the new data. For example: “Does it mean we need more money for maternal health or less?”

 Sarah Boseley’s Global Health Blog

“…It’s remarkable news – and all the more remarkable because it’s been happening without anyone realising it. It’s like waking up and finding somebody has demolished the ugly old building across the road and planted trees instead. Hard to believe the scenery has changed quite so dramatically. The new optimistic outlook will take some getting used to. This is what Dr Murray told me.

The whole community has been living off 500,000 women dying a year for the last 30 years. That’s fed a sense of almost pessimism that it is difficult to change maternal mortality.

Murray and colleagues have got new data, that has not been systematically put together in the past, and new tools…”

Read the full story, Saving Women’s Lives in Childbirth–It’s More Possible Than We Thought.

Read Full Post »

Kaiser Health News reports on a variety of innovative approaches to global health challenges that were developed in developing countries like Haiti and Nigeria–and are now being utilized in developed countries. Dr. Michael Merson, director of the Duke Global Health Institute, explains that in the past, development work was seen as a one way street, with the rich helping the poor.  He points out that these days have passed and we are entering a new era of international development that involves a “true sense of shared partnership.” This article highlights several global health innovations developed in resource poor settings that are now being adopted in the US, like Kangaroo Care.

Kaiser Health News

“…GE is tapping into the increasingly popular idea that medical innovation should be a global two-way street in which the West benefits from the resourcefulness and frugality poorer nations apply to health problems. The idea isn’t new, but it’s gaining traction, beyond the creation of products and technology, as public health experts rethink ways to prevent disease and deliver care…

…’Kangaroo care,’ an approach developed in Colombia, is another example. With a major shortage of incubators, doctors advised mothers to cradle preterm babies in a sling. They did so well that it changed what had been the conventional approach in the U.S….”

Read the full story here.

Read Full Post »

The Seattle Times reports on a rise in Gates Foundation funding for programs that aim to improve maternal and newborn health–and according to Melinda Gates, investing in the health of moms and babies saves lives at a far lower cost than treating diseases later on.

The Seattle Times

“…Gates talked about teaching a method known as “Kangaroo Mother Care,” which encourages mothers to wrap and hold their babies until they can maintain their own body temperature. (In fact a study published this week found that “kangaroo mother care” cut newborn deaths by more than 50 percent and was more effective than incubators). Inexpensive drugs can also prevent mothers from hemorrhaging in childbirth.

Such a comprehensive program, together with contraception, could cut maternal deaths by 75 percent and reduce newborn deaths by 44 percent, she said…”

Read the full article, Melinda Gates: Foundation Investing More in Mothers and Newborns.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 170 other followers