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Posts Tagged ‘child health’

On July 1st, the Women Deliver team announced the top five highlights from the 2010 conference (June 7-9). See below for a summary of the conference highlights–with links to publications, videos, photos, and additional information that came out of the conference.

This post was originally posted on the Women Deliver website and is reposted on MMD with permission from Women Deliver.
conference-participants.jpg

Women Deliver 2010 Conference participants

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the success of the second Women Deliver global conference. To put world leaders on notice that the time for action on maternal health is now, 3,400 advocates, policymakers, development leaders, health care professionals, youth, and media from 146 countries converged on Washington, DC on June 7-9 at Women Deliver 2010. More than 800 speeches and presentations were given at the six plenaries and 120 breakout sessions.  The heads of five UN agencies, plus the Secretary-General of the United Nations, attended. Thirty countries, UN agencies, the World Bank, corporations, and foundations helped support Women Deliver. Please see below for highlights and recaps of the conference.

1. Key Statements. Read the outcome statements from the:

2. Webcasts. Watch the videos from our plenary sessions and our press conferences, and watch Hillary Clinton’s address to the Women Deliver 2010 attendees.

3. Photos. Take a look at photos from the plenary sessions, breakout sessions and other conference events, and download them at no cost.

4. Programme. Review the plenary and breakout sessions that were held at Women Deliver 2010.

5. Publications and Advocacy Tools. Visit our Knowledge Center to download publications and advocacy tools, including:

Stay tuned for our summary report on breakout sessions by theme.

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In an effort to improve the reproductive health, maternal and neonatal health, maternal and child nutrition and access/use of vaccines of the poorest 20% of Mesoamerica (which translates to 8 million people in Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Belize and the southern states of Mexico), the Gates Foundation, the Carlos Slim Health Institute, the Spanish government and the Inter-American Development Bank have formed an innovative public-private partnership–called Salud Mesoamerica 2015.

IDB (Inter-American Development Bank)

“…Salud Mesoamérica 2015 will work in partnership with the health ministries of Mesoamerican countries and in close coordination with the Mesoamerican Public Health System. This system is part of the regional integration platform known as Proyecto Mesoamérica.

In contrast to many other international programs, countries will not compete for resources under SM2015, because amounts will be allocated per country over a five-year period based on their poverty and health inequality status. Moreover, governments themselves will determine the projects that will be financed by the Initiative within the identified areas…”

Read the full story.

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Several U.N. agencies recently collaborated on a text messaging initiative to improve communication between community health workers and pregnant women in a community in Rwanda. Local women, health workers, and hospital directors are raving about the initiative but scaling up the project throughout the country may prove challenging; only 6% of the population in Rwanda has electricity and charging phones often means long walks to charging stations.

Reuters

“…John Kalach, director of the nearest hospital in Ruhengeri, says since Rapid SMS launched in August 2009, his hospital has had no maternal deaths, compared to 10 the previous year.

‘We used to get ladies coming here with serious complications just because they delayed the decision because the journey was very long,’ he says.

Kalach says authorities can use the data to work out which diseases affect women during pregnancy, the causes of death for children below five years, the volume and type of drugs required, and to monitor population growth rates.

Friday Nwaigwe, UNICEF’s country head of child health and nutrition, says the next step is to give mobile phones to 17,500 maternal health workers across the country and eventually to all 50,000 community health workers…”

Read the full story here.

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The official launch of the Countdown to 2015 Decade Report (2000-2010) will be at the Women Deliver and Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival conferences next week (the Countdown meeting is being held in conjunction with Women Deliver) –but the report is now available to download on the Countdown to 2015 website.

Countdown to 2015-Maternal, Newborn, and Child Survival

From the report:

“The Countdown report for 2010 contains good news–many countries are making progress, reducing mortality and increasing coverage of effective health interventions at an accelerating pace. But the news is not all good. Many Countdown countries are still off track for achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 (reduce child mortality) and 5 (improve maternal health) and are not increasing coverage of key health interventions quickly enough…”

Click here to download the report and/or the brochure with highlights from the report.

Click here for a press release on the new report.

Click here for a special message from Countdown for conference participants about the special track at Women Deliver for Countdown to 2015 sessions.

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Dr. Fred Sai is co-host of Women Deliver 2010, former reproductive health and HIV/AIDS advisor to the Ghanaian government, and has spent 40 years working to improve the health of women and children in Ghana and throughout Africa.  In his June 2nd blog post, A New Role For Africans in Maternal Health, on the ONE Blog, Dr. Sai comments on the new maternal mortality estimates published in the Lancet that show a dramatic reduction in global maternal deaths–and asks questions about why Africa (as a whole) has not seen these same reductions. He also expresses confidence that a shift in approach (described in his post) will lead to major improvements in the health of women and children throughout Africa.

The ONE Blog

“…It is an unfortunate truth that progress for the world at large does not necessarily mean progress for Africa. In 1980, almost a quarter of maternal deaths occurred in African countries. Today that figure has doubled to more than half. All but one of the 30 countries with the worst maternal mortality statistics are in Africa. And while countries like Ghana and Rwanda have seen a steady decline in maternal deaths over the past 15 years, others such as Malawi, Lesotho, Zimbabwe, Nigeria and Cote d’Ivoire actually have higher maternal mortality rates than they did in 1990.

Addressing maternal mortality in Africa is complex and challenging. Our countries face increasing rates of HIV, entrenched and debilitating poverty, food shortages, weak education and health care systems, problematic governance, corruption, and civil conflict. These are huge issues in their own right, but they also have significant impact on maternal, newborn and child health. The challenges, however, are not the whole story…”

Read the full post, A New Role For Africans in Maternal Health.

For additional reactions to the Lancet publication from other leaders in the maternal health field, click here.

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The symposium, Measuring the Progress on Maternal and Child Mortality: Data, Alternative Methods, and Findings, will be held on May 24th from 11:15am to 5pm at the Washington D.C. Kaiser Family Foundation office, immediately following a 9:30am policy forum on maternal and child health organized by the Kaiser Family Foundation. This all day symposium will bring together several maternal and child health experts and will be moderated by Editor-in-Chief of the Lancet, Richard Horton.

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

“…The all day event is designed to initiate vigorous scientific dialogue around the data and analytic approaches used in determining maternal and child mortality rates around the world. The symposium will also highlight the critical role that multiple organizations play in analyzing and disseminating mortality findings in order to strengthen overall methods and results…”

Speakers include:

Diego Bassani, Centre for Global Health Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto
Ties Boerma, WHO
Ed Bos, World Bank
Trevor Croft, ICF Macro
Amanda Glassman, Inter-American Development Bank
Alan Lopez, University of Queensland
Rafael Lozano, IHME and former General Director of Health Information at the Ministry of Health in Mexico
Christopher JL Murray, IHME
Kenji Shibuya, University of Tokyo

Click here for the official event announcement.

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A new report by Save the Children, “State of the World’s Mothers 2010,” identifies Norway as the best place in the world to be a mother–and Afghanistan as the worst.

Save the Children

The focus of the report is on the shortage of front line health workers in developing countries–and the critical need to train more female health workers in order to save the lives of women, children and newborns living in the most marginalized communities.

“Mothers in Norway and Australia are living in the best places in the world, according to Save the Children’s 11th annual “Mothers’ Index”, which ranks the best and worst places to be a mother.  Afghanistan ranked at the bottom of the list of 160 countries, which included 43 developed nations and 117 in the developing world.

The “Mothers’ Index” is highlighted in Save the Children’s State of the World’s Mothers 2010 report, which examines the many ways women working on the front lines of health care are helping to save the lives of mothers, newborns and young children, and makes an urgent call to increase the number of front-line health workers in the world’s poorest nations….”

Read the full post on the Save the Children site for an overview of the report with a list of the top ten (and bottom ten) places to be a mother–and several very interesting country comparisons across maternal and child health indicators.

UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives are also speaking out about the urgent need to train more front line health workers in difficult to reach communities. I posted an excerpt of their statement a couple hours ago.

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