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The Safe Motherhood Program at the University of California, San Francisco is looking for two interns: one office intern to be based in the San Francisco office and one field intern to be based in the Copperbelt region of Zambia.

1.) UCSF Safe Motherhood Office Intern, San Francisco – Summer 2012

The focus of this internship is to prepare presentations for an upcoming international conference in order to effectively show the latest data on the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for obstetric hemorrhage clinical trial.  The intern will also gain some experience in handling and cleaning a large data set.

For more information on the trial please visit www.lifewrap.organd http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00488462.

Duties:

  • Assist with data cleaning and analyses for the international trial for the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) for obstetric hemorrhage
  • Prepare multiple Power Point presentations to include data for an upcoming international conference
  • Other light administrative duties as required

Qualifications:

  • Excellent Power Point and writing skills are a must!
  • Knowledge of STATA, SPSS, Word, Excel.
  • Experience with online data systems is a plus.

Start date: June 1, 2012.

Duration: 12 weeks, 40 hrs/week

Note: This internship is unpaid.

Please send CV, cover letter and a writing sample to Jennifer Clark at jclark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu.

Please apply by 2/15 to be considered for initial screening.

2.) UCSF Safe Motherhood Zambia Field Intern – Summer 2012

The focus of this internship is to support the Zambia team of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) trial.  The study aims to reduce maternal mortality and morbidities in Zambia and Zimbabwe caused by obstetric hemorrhage.  This is a cluster randomized control study which compares outcomes based on evidence from intervention and control clinics.  The intervention clinics in this study are the clinics that are using the NASG as a first aid device for patients suffering from hypovolemic shock caused by bleeding during pregnancy.

For more information on the trial please visit www.lifewrap.organd http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00488462.

Duties:

  • Provide logistical support for the local Zambian team – distributing supplies, copies, etc
  • Review data collection forms
  • Encourage protocol adherence
  • Conduct training with local hospital and clinic staff
  • Visit the study clinics
  • Follow up on cases
  • Liaise with the San Francisco office and the in-country staff

Qualifications:

  • Experience in international settings
  • Interest in maternal health
  • Research experience
  • Familiarity with clinical environments
  • Must be highly detail-oriented, organized and have excellent follow-through skills

Start Date: May 30, 2012

Duration: 12 weeks, 40 hours/week

Note: Candidates are expected to secure outside funding to cover roundtrip airfare and living expenses for the duration of the internship.

Please send cv, cover letter and a writing sample to Jennifer Clark at jclark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu.

Please apply by 2/15 to be considered for initial screening!

View past intern experiences on our intern blog: http://lifewrapinterns.wordpress.com/.

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The Safe Motherhood Program at UCSF is accepting applications for an upcoming internship opportunity in the Copper-belt of Zambia. The intern will spend the majority of their time in the labor and gynecology wards at a district hospital and several peri-urban clinics, gaining an understanding of front-line maternal health service delivery and research.

Position Description:

This internship is based in the Copperbelt Region of Zambia.  The intern will work on a study that aims to reduce maternal mortality and morbidities in Zambia and Zimbabwe caused by obstetric hemorrhage.  This is a cluster randomized control study that compares outcomes based on evidence from intervention and control clinics.  The intervention clinics in this study are the clinics that are using the NASG (Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment) as a first aid device for patients suffering from hypovolemic shock caused by bleeding during pregnancy.

Some of the duties of the intern include:

-Providing logistic support for the local Zambian team – distributing supplies, copies, etc.
-Reviewing data collection forms
-Encouraging protocol adherence
-Conducting trainings with local hospital and clinic staff
-Visiting the study clinics
-Following up on cases
-Liaising with the San Francisco office and the in-country staff

Desired qualifications: Experience in international settings, interest in maternal health, research experience, familiarity with clinical environments.  Must be highly detail-oriented, be well organized and have excellent follow-through skills.

Time requirements: Must be able to commit a minimum of 2 months in the Copperbelt, although 3 months is preferred.

Compensation/Funding:
Interns must secure their own funding for travel and lodging. There is no funding for these positions but it is valuable experience for someone who wants to make a huge difference in women’s lives.

To learn more about the NASG (Life Wrap), visit: www.lifewrap.org.

If interested, please send your CV and cover letter to Elizabeth Butrick at ebutrick@globalhealth.ucsf.edu, with a copy to Kathleen McDonald at kathleen.p.mcdonald@gmail.com

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The Global Health Corps is now accepting applications for their fellowship placements in Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, and the USA.

I learned about this opportunity from Emily Bearse, a GHC fellowship alum, current GHC staff member, and grad school buddy of mine!  Here is what Emily had to say about it:

“Being a GHC alum from their inaugural class as well as working on their staff team now, I truly believe GHC has a great model and the power to build the movement for global health equity. We are built on a unique partnership model where we work with existing organizations addressing pressing issues in under-served communities. We partner one national with one international fellow at each site to promote knowledge sharing and synergies in order to create deeper impacts in the communities where fellows serve. We engage people from outside the traditional health space in order to bring valuable expertise to strengthen health systems.”

Emily also mentioned that GHC is offering several placements with Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, Millennium Villages Project, and mothers2mothers–organizations with a strong focus on maternal and child health.

Excerpt from the press release:

“Global Health Corps is expanding this year to support 70 emerging leaders in their 2011-2012 fellowship class. Applications for placements in Burundi, Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda and the USA are now open at www.apply.ghcorps.org.  GHC is seeking applicants with diverse skill-sets from areas that are often viewed as outside of the traditional health workforce—managers, communicators, architects, computer scientists, supply chain analysts and other exceptional young people from disciplines important to building strong health systems.

‘The complexity and scope of today’s challenges requires people with diverse skills from a wide range of fields beyond medicine. To truly shift the tide of global health challenges, we need to engage young leaders from all backgrounds.’ Barbara Bush, cofounder and CEO said.

Global Health Corps aims to mobilize a global community of emerging leaders to build the movement for global health equity. GHC does this by providing young leaders year long paid fellowships with outstanding organizations working on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity…”

Read the full press release here.

For more info about the Global Health Corps, click here.

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The International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University is offering two groups of fellowships this spring: International Journalism and Global Health Reporting.

Up to five fellows will be selected for the Global Health Reporting Fellowship with the International Reporting Project. They will be given five weeks to report on a specific topic in global health such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, or maternal and child health.

“Fellows will spend two weeks in Washington at the IRP offices preparing for their overseas trips and then five weeks reporting on their chosen health topics in the country of their choice. Fellows will return to Washington for a final two weeks of reporting and presentations of their findings.”

Eligible candidates are journalists based in the United States with five years of professional experience in journalism.

The dates of the fellowship are March 3, 2011 to May 7, 2011.

Deadline to apply is December 20, 2010.

For more info, click here.

Click  here to apply!

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This November, Sudan will host the International Conference on Reproductive Health Management. Abstracts and full papers are now being accepted across a variety of themes–and full scholarships will be provided for accepted abstracts and papers.

Themes for the conference include the following: addressing unmet need for family planning, community mobilization for reproductive health, meeting the needs of health workers, health financing, safe motherhood, women focused service delivery, social aspects of reproductive health, and reproductive health in emergency situations.

Click here for a post on the MHTF Blog with more information about the conference–and info on how to submit an abstract.

Check out the conference website here.

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In my role at the Maternal Health Task Force, I am helping to coordinate a global team of guest bloggers who will write about the Global Maternal Health Conference next month–and contribute to the online dialogue around the sessions occurring at the conference. The conference will be held in New Delhi, India–but several sessions will be live-streamed. If you are attending the conference in Delhi or plan to participate remotely via live-stream and are interested in blogging, see below for details on how to join the global team of guest bloggers!

Originally posted on the MHTF Blog.

Blogging Team

Blogging is an effective communications strategy for sharing information in real time and fueling dialogue around key maternal health issues. With the Global Maternal Health Conference 2010 right around the corner, our team is looking forward to a lively online discussion around the happenings of the conference. In an effort to fuel a robust dialogue with a variety of global perspectives, we are connecting with global health and development bloggers around the world.

At this time, we are in the process of identifying a cohort of articulate guest bloggers to convey the important activities happening at the conference. If you are attending the conference (either as a presenter or a participant, either in India or remotely via live webcast) and would like to guest blog about the work you are presenting or the sessions you attend, please submit a brief statement of interest or a sample blog post of less than 300 words to Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).

Guest blog posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and will be cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.

If you plan to blog about the conference on your own blog, please let us know! We would love to discuss linking to your posts and possibly cross-posting.

For more information, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchell@engenderhealth.org).



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Cross-posted from the MHTF Blog.

The World Health Organization (WHO) invites you to join the WHO Guidance Global Discussion Forum on Prevention of Maternal and Perinatal Mortality and Morbidity.

The online forum will be held from July 26th – August 6th, 2010.

The 2 week virtual discussion forum is designed to provide an opportunity for people to share their ideas, experience and opinions about the type of evidence-based guidance WHO should produce in order to support the reduction of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity.

Over the two-week forum participants will receive one to two emails per day: one email to introduce the day’s questions, and one daily digest of the contributions. Five questions will be addressed, and each discussed over two consecutive days. All contributions received will be acknowledged.

For any questions on this Virtual Global Discussion Forum please contact the forum facilitator: Cordelia Coltart at coltartc@who.int.

Click here for official announcement and invitation to the discussion forum.

REGISTER NOW!

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At a gathering of U.S. and Pakistani officials on Monday in Islamabad, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that many Pakistanis believe that U.S. involvement in Pakistan “narrowly focuses” on security issues. Clinton said that the U.S. is working to change that–and will be funding several new health and development projects in Pakistan worth over $500m over the next five years.

Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report

“…USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah said the new projects reflect Pakistani priorities and demonstrates that the U.S. “commitment is broad and deep,” Bloomberg Businessweek writes. Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. special representative to Pakistan, noted that the focus on water is the result of a specific request from Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi. “The first phase of the multi-year water program will encompass seven initiatives at a cost of $270 million and include dam irrigation projects in rural areas to control flooding, and improve water supply and quality,” the news service writes.

Another three-year $28 million health project plans to “build an obstetrics and gynecology hospital ward and training center at a hospital that handles 17,000 births a year. The health funds would also increase bed capacity at Pakistan’s largest maternity hospital, Lahore’s Lady Willingdon,” according to Bloomberg Businessweek…”

Read the full story here.

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The application process is now closed for this position. (7/22/10)

The Safe Motherhood Program at UCSF is accepting applications for an upcoming internship opportunity in the Copper-belt of Zambia. The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will support the start-up of a randomized control trial of the Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG) in 24 midwifery-led clinics as a low-tech and low-cost life-saving method for treating shock, resuscitating, stabilizing and preventing further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage.

See below for background information on the Safe Motherhood Program and the use of the NASG–as well as details on the internship including expected deliverables, qualifications, timeline, and information on how to apply.

Background

The mission of Safe Motherhood Program at the University of California, San Francisco, is to prevent maternal deaths by promoting women’s health and human rights.   This international research program is part of the UCSF Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, which engages in the advancement of new reproductive health technologies and development of innovative programs to improve reproductive health.  The Safe Motherhood Program is also a member of the Women’s Health and Empowerment Center of Expertise (COE), one of three centers within the University of California Global Health Institute.  The primary goals of the Safe Motherhood Program are to:

  1. Conduct rigorous, relevant and timely research resulting in new and applicable knowledge
  2. Reduce pregnancy related death and disability
  3. Ensure maternal survival through principles of respect, dignity and equality
  4. Create direct and practical links from research to policy to implementation
  5. Train health care workers in low-resource settings
  6. Raise community awareness of maternal health
  7. Disseminate information and innovations globally

Working with distinguished colleagues in a variety of countries, the Safe Motherhood Program has the knowledge, skills, vision, technology, and energy to make a real difference in the advancement of women’s reproductive health throughout the world.

Non-pneumatic Anti-Shock Garment (NASG)

In many poor countries women deliver at home, often without skilled attendants or at clinics with limited services available.  If complications arise and a woman bleeds heavily, one, two or all of the “three delays” (Thaddeus and Maine, 1994) may impede her ability to access timely treatment.  Many women do not survive these delays.  In recognition of the direct and indirect root causes of maternal death and disability, the Safe Motherhood Program works to ensure all women have an equitable opportunity to survive childbirth.

A major research effort of the Safe Motherhood Program, the NASG is a low-technology and low cost life-saving device used to treat shock, resuscitate, stabilize and prevent further bleeding in women with obstetric hemorrhage (www.lifewraps.org).  Use of the NASG as part of standard management of shock and hemorrhage has demonstrated promising outcomes for women in low-resource settings, where appropriate health care providers and technologies are limited or non-existent.  To date, NASG use has reduced maternal mortality and morbidity by over 50%.

Internship Opportunity

To build upon the early and promising data, a randomized cluster trial is underway in Zambia and Zimbabwe.  Specifically, the trial addresses the question of whether the early application of the NASG at midwife-led maternity clinics, before transport to a Referral Hospital, will decrease maternal mortality and morbidity.

The internship will take place in the Copper-belt of Zambia and support the start-up of the randomized control trial of the NASG in 24 midwifery-led maternity clinics.  The intern(s) (2 or more interns are needed) will work with the clinics during their transition from Phase 2 study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility) to Phase 3 of the research study (women with obstetrical complications transported to referral facility in the NASG).  Specific activities will include: Observing clinical procedures at the clinics and supporting clinical protocol adherence, observing data collection and supporting research protocol adherence, helping/training data collectors become familiar with data collection forms, matching data collection forms begun at the clinic with data collection forms completed at the referral facilities, supervising cleaning and completion of data collection forms, and training new providers (midwives, residents, medical officers) in the addition of the NASG to emergency response for hemorrhage.

The intern(s) will receive mentorship and supervision from the Safe Motherhood team members both in Zambia and in the US during the field experience.

Deliverables

Weekly reports on progress, participation in weekly calls/Skype with Project Coordinator are expected.

Qualifications

  • Professional degree, graduate student or junior faculty in the health or social sciences (such as medicine, nursing, public health, anthropology, sociology, etc.)
  • Previous experience in health or social science research
  • Knowledge of global sexual and reproductive health, maternal health preferred
  • Ability to work well with partners
  • Flexibility and willingness to travel
  • Highest preference for those with some midwifery/obstetric experience or those who have worked on field-based research projects

Timeline

The internship requires a minimum eight-week commitment (Fall 2010 – Winter 2011) to live and work in Zambia.  Preference will be given to applicants who can remain in Zambia longer than 8-weeks.

Expression of Interest

To apply for the internship, please send a current resume and cover letter to Ms. Elizabeth Butrick (ebutrick@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) with copy to Ms. Jennifer Clark (JClark@globalhealth.ucsf.edu) by August 15, 2010.

For more information on the use of the NASG (specifically the LifeWrap), check out a recent guest post from the Director of the Safe Motherhood Project, Suellen Miller, on the Maternal Health Task Force‘s new MedScape blog, GlobalMama. (You will need to register with MedScape. Registration is free.)

Also, take a look at www.lifewrap.org for additional information about LifeWraps.

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If you are interested in and skilled at using various forms of social media to increase the visibility of an organization or raise awareness for a cause–and also have a solid understanding of global sexual and reproductive health issues, you might want to take a look at this newly created job at EngenderHealth in New York City!
Excerpt from Job Description:

“…Working with the entire Communications and Marketing (C & M) Team, the Copywriter/Social Media Associate is responsible for conceptualizing and writing an array of communications and promotional materials, and growing EngenderHealth’s presence in the blogosphere and social media. The Copywriter/Social Media Associate is responsible for translating technical information into understandable and compelling language that will inform, appeal to and inspire multiple audiences (e.g., donors, professional audiences, media, and the general public). The Copywriter/Social Media Associate undertakes research to develop story ideas, and produces well-researched, lucid content for a variety of communications vehicles, such as brochures, newsletters, and online platforms.

The Copywriter/Social Media Associate will work closely with the Director and Manager of the Communications and Marketing Department to develop promotional and communication dissemination plans, and assist in the implementation of communications and marketing campaigns. The Copywriter/Social Media Associate will spend up to 40% of his/her time managing social media efforts to grow EngenderHealth’s online presence in this area. He/she will report directly to the Manager of Communications & Marketing…”

Learn more about the job and apply here.

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I attended a press conference yesterday (6/17) where Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth announced the 16 winners of the Young Champions for Maternal Health competition. The 16 Young Champions come from 13 different countries and will be placed with Ashoka Fellows around the world for a 9-month mentorship.

Excerpt from my post on the MHTF Blog:

“…Tim Thomas explained that improving global maternal health is a persistent challenge—and one that will need to be tackled via multiple sectors. Tim pointed out that the Young Champions have big and innovative ideas for improving maternal health—and that the Ashoka Fellows will play a crucial role in teaching the Champions about social entrepreneurship, building sustainable infrastructure, and how to ‘scale-up’ global health projects—so that their big ideas can result in real and lasting impact.

A big idea is precisely what Yeabsira Mehari has—and she looks forward to tapping into Glory Alexander’s wisdom to develop the idea. Yeabsira aspires to set up a fistula care center in Ethiopia that will address both the health needs of the women affected by fistula as well as the economic and socio-cultural effects of fistula. Her dream is to establish a fistula care center that will prepare women to be social entrepreneurs themselves–by providing them with midwifery training and/or small business development training as well as offering micro-loans to get their businesses off the ground.

Ashoka India Fellow Glory Alexander works to end stigma and discrimination associated with HIV/AIDS in India. Her organization, ASHA Foundation, focuses on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS and primary prevention for vulnerable women.   Aside from learning about social entrepreneurship, sustainability, and ‘scale-up’, Yeabsira is excited to work with Glory to develop expertise in engaging with and helping to empower stigmatized populations. She anticipates that many of the lessons she will learn from working with HIV/AIDS patients in India will be transferable to working with fistula patients in Ethiopia…”

Read my full post on the MHTF Blog.

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US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently announced the Secretary’s Innovation Award for the Empowerment of Women and Girls, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. This award aims to enable individuals and organizations to develop new and sustainable ways to empower women and girls around the world.  Two winners will be selected and each will receive a grant of up to $500,000.

Excerpt from the (6/14) USA Today blog post about the award:

“The award, which is funded by the Rockefeller Foundation for three years, is open to both men and women who are ‘working on innovative approaches to the political, economic and social empowerment of women and girls around the globe,’ the award’s news release states. The prize? Two lucky recipients each year will receive a grant of up to $500,000 to help expand the scope of their idea…”

Read more.

Excerpt from the call for concept papers:

“The Secretary’s Innovation Award for the Empowerment of Women and Girls seeks to find and bring to scale the most pioneering approaches to the political, economic and social empowerment of women and girls around the globe. Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the award is part of the State Department’s continuing emphasis on public-private partnerships, and is administered by its Office of Global Women’s Issues. The award, and the office, are founded on the premise that the major economic, security, governance and environmental challenges of our time cannot be solved without the full participation of women at all levels of society. The Rockefeller Foundation, as part of its mission to expand opportunity and promote more equitable growth, seeks to identify innovative approaches that can be scaled to address these challenges…”

Read more.

Click here to view the video of the official launch of the award—with speeches by Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and President of the Rockefeller Foundation, Judith Rodin.

If you are interested, act now! Concept papers are due June 21st! Papers must be submitted to SGWIRFPInnovation@state.gov.

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Join Dr. Harry Strulovici, Founder and President of Life for Mothers, Director of  the International Maternal Health Initiative within the Division of Reproductive Global Health and  Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at NYU School of Medicine; Julie McLaughlin, the Sector Manager for Health, Nutrition and Population in the South Asia Region of the World Bank; and Samuel Mills MD DrPH, a consultant in the Health, Nutrition and Population Unit of the Human Development Network for a presentation and Q&A  at the World Bank on reducing maternal and neonatal mortality in Uganda through a holistic approach.

Life for Mothers

When: Jun 15, 2010, 12:30-2pm

Where: World Bank: 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433

What : Presentation on a Holistic Strategy To Reduce Maternal/Neonatal Mortality in Uganda

Who:

  • Dr. Harry Strulovici, director of  the International Maternal Health Initiative within the Division of Reproductive Global Health and  Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at NYU School of Medicine
  • Julie McLaughlin,the Sector Manager for Health, Nutrition and Population in the South Asia Region of the World Bank
  • Samuel Mills MD DrPH, a consultant in the Health, Nutrition and Population Unit of the Human Development Network at the World Bank

Schedule of events: Lecture with Q&A

RSVP: Contact Victor Arias at varias@worldbank.org

Click here for more details.

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If you have experience implementing Clean Birth Kits, you can help Saving Newborn Lives and Johns Hopkins University to close the knowledge gap around Clean Birth Kits—and gain a better understanding of their use and potential efficacy in improving maternal and newborn health.

The MHTF Blog

Saving Newborn Lives and Johns Hopkins University are conducting a short survey on implementation experiences with Clean Birth Kits, including contents, methods of distribution, and incentives/disincentives issues. The survey also includes potential CBK “add ons.” The results will be used to summarize the evidence on the use of birth kits in various contexts, to identify knowledge gaps, and, where appropriate, to make programmatic recommendations.”

Click here to take the survey.

The survey will close this Sunday, June 6th.

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The official launch of the Countdown to 2015 Decade Report (2000-2010) will be at the Women Deliver and Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival conferences next week (the Countdown meeting is being held in conjunction with Women Deliver) –but the report is now available to download on the Countdown to 2015 website.

Countdown to 2015-Maternal, Newborn, and Child Survival

From the report:

“The Countdown report for 2010 contains good news–many countries are making progress, reducing mortality and increasing coverage of effective health interventions at an accelerating pace. But the news is not all good. Many Countdown countries are still off track for achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 (reduce child mortality) and 5 (improve maternal health) and are not increasing coverage of key health interventions quickly enough…”

Click here to download the report and/or the brochure with highlights from the report.

Click here for a press release on the new report.

Click here for a special message from Countdown for conference participants about the special track at Women Deliver for Countdown to 2015 sessions.

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